My Grandfather Is a Magician

This is the story of a small Nigerian boy who doesn’t know what job to do when he grows up. His father teaches in a school; his mother owns a bakery; but maybe he should follow his grandfather who seems wiser and more interesting than any of them – for he is a traditional healer.

Chike and the River

The more Chike saw the ferry-boats the more he wanted to make the trip to Asaba. But where would he get the money? He did not know. Still, he hoped.Eleven-year-old Chike longs to cross the Niger River to the city of Asaba, but he doesn’t have the six pence he needs to pay for the ferry ride. With the help of his friend S.M.O.G., he embarks on a series of adventures to help him get there. Along the way, he is exposed to a range of new experiences that are both thrilling and terrifying, from eating his first skewer of suya under the shade of a mango tree, to visiting the village magician who promises to double the money in his pocket. Once he finally makes it across the river, Chike realizes that life on the other side is far different from his expectations, and he must find the courage within him to make it home.

How the Leopard Got His Claws

In the beginning, all the animals lived as friends.  The leopard, their king was strong but gentle and wise.  Only the dog had sharp teeth, and only the dog scoffed at the animals plan to build a common shelter for gathering out of the rain.  but when the dog was flooded out of his own cave, he attacked the leopard and took over as king.  It was only then that the leopard returned with a new roar, sharp claws, and shining teeth, life for the animals would never be the same.

In this riveting fable for young readers, Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe, author of Things Fall Apart, evokes themes of liberation and justice that echo his novels about post-colonial Africa.  Glowing with vibrant color, Mary GrandPre’s expressive and action-filled paintings bring this unforgettable tale dramatically to life.

Juba This, Juba That

Traditional “juba” rhythms have a long history. They originated in Nigeria as hand-clapping games. People who were brought to the New World as slaves fought hard to keep their culture alive against terrible odds. They transformed “juba” rhythms into work songs that were passed down orally.

Master Man: A Tall Tale of Nigeria

A boastful strong man learns a lesson harder than his muscles when he encounters one of Nigeria’s superheroes in this Hausa tale which explains the origin of thunder.

Anna Hibiscus’ Song

Anna Hibicus is so filled with happiness that she feels like she might float away. And the more she talks to her mother and father and grandfather and grandmother and aunties and cousins about it, the more her happiness grows! There’s only one thing to do. Sing!

See the review at WOW Review, Volume IV, Issue 4

The No 1 Car Spotter

Oluwalase Babatunde Benson is Number 1. He’s the Number 1 car spotter in his African village. The Number 1 car spotter in the world! The start of an exciting new series about the irresistible Number 1, whose hobby is car spotting, but who is good at solving all sorts of problems for his village.

See the review at WOW Review, Volume IV, Issue 4

Emeka’s Gift

This is a concept book to teach and delight. As a young African boy travels to visit his grandmother, he passes through the village market, where he sees lots of things Granny would like — four brooms, five hats, six necklaces, seven musical instruments, and so on. Stunning photographs taken in Emeka’s southern Nigerian village illustrate this heartwarming story.

Chinye: A West African Folk Tale

Poor Chinye! Back and forth through the dark forest she goes, fetching and carrying for her cruel stepmother and lazy stepsister. Terror lurks behind every tree, and ghostly figures cross her path–but strange powers are watching over her, and waiting somewhere in the moonlight is a hut piled high with magic gourds.