Chicora And The Little People

“Listen!” Chicora pleaded. “Last night, I opened my eyes and saw tiny hands reaching through the lodge flap. I screamed, ‘Leave me alone!’ and the little hands disappeared.” The legend of Chicora and the Little People: The Legend of the Indian Corn, begins long ago in the time known as the Moon of the Turning Leaves. Chicora, a young Lumbee girl, is awakened from her sleep by gruff giggling and little hands reaching through the flap of her home lodge. She attempts to tell the villagers of the appearance of the little people and the new corn. How can Chicora convince her tribe of the truth?

In The Footsteps Of Crazy Horse

Jimmy, a young Lakota boy, struggles with fitting in on his reservation because he does not look like the other Lakota boys; he has light hair, blue eyes, and his father is of Scottish decent. Grandpa Nyles sees an opportunity to introduce Jimmy to another Lakota who had fair hair and light skin—the famous Crazy Horse. Over the course of their trip, Grandpa Nyles recounts history and stories about the life of the Lakota hero and the events that shaped him into a powerful leader, including famous battles and standoffs against the white settlers.

Children Left Behind: The Dark Legacy Of Indian Mission Boarding Schools

Tim Giago weaves memoir, commentary, reflection and poetry together to boldly illustrate his often-horrific experiences as a child at an Indian Mission boarding school run by the Catholic Church. Through his words, the experience of one Indian child becomes a metaphor for the experience of many who were literally ripped from their tribal roots and torn from their families for nine months of the year in order to be molded to better fit into mainstream America. They were not allowed to speak their own languages or follow their traditional customs, and cases of physical, sexual and psychological abuse were common. As a result, the Mission school experience often resulted in isolation, confusion, and intense psychological pain. This has contributed to problems including alcoholism, drug abuse, family violence and general alienation in an entire generation of Native Americans. Dramatic and intensely moving black-and white illustrations by Giagos daughter Denise illuminate the text.