Earth Daughter: Alicia of Acoma Pueblo

Alicia, a member of the Acoma Pueblo, learns the art of pottery from her parents, from shale collecting in the canyon to the formation and decoration of pots, in a cultural examination of a time-honored Pueblo tradition.

Lolo and Red-Legs

When eleven-year-old Lolo captures a tarantula, it turns an ordinary summer into a series of adventures that take him and his friends beyond their Mexican-American neighborhood in East Los Angeles.

Burro’s Tortillas

burro'sWhat do you get when you cross The Little Red Hen with a burro and his friends? Burro s Tortillas! In this humorous Southwestern retelling of a childhood favorite, Burro finds it difficult to get any help from his friends as he diligently works to turn corn into tortillas. Young children will love the repetition; older children will enjoy the book’s many puns. In addition to its Southwestern flavor, the delightful story imparts an accurate picture of the traditional way that tortillas are made. A Spanish/English glossary and a simple recipe for making tortillas are included in the For Creative Minds section.

Isabel’s Texas Two-Step (Beacon Street Girls)

Isabel’s sister Elena Maria is turning fifteen, and the Martinez family is planning her quinceañera — at Uncle Hector’s ranch in San Antonio!

Fiesta Dress: A Quinceanera Tale

It s the day of Lolo’s big sister’s quinceañera party, and suddenly everyone is too busy to play with Lolo. But when she lets her dog Gobi runfree, everyone notices. Vivid illustrations in acrylics and watercolor by Martha Aviles skillfully portray Lolo using her fast feet and wits to outsmart Gobi and save her big sister’s special day!

We Won’t Back Down: Severita Lara’s Rise From Student Leader To Mayor (Hispanic Civil Rights)

An enlightening biography for young adults of a little-known female activist in the Hispanic Civil Rights Movement On December 9, 1969, change was in the air. The small town of Crystal City, Texas would never be the same. After weeks of petitioning for a hearing with the Crystal City school board, students of Crystal City High and their parents descended on the superintendent’s office. The students had been threatened with suspension and even physical violence. Powerful members of the community had insisted they would fire the parents of students if they went in front of the school board, and still, they came. Finally, the school board removed the chairs in the gallery, and the parents and students stood until members of the school board fled to avoid the confrontation. As the students and their parents stood in front of the building, a cry rose from the crowd. “Walk out. Walk out.” So began the Crystal City High student walk out. At the center of the fervor was Severita Lara. Called la cabezuda, or stubborn girl, by her mother, Lara bore the mark of a leader from an early age. She was not afraid to stand up to anyone: girls or boys, teachers or superintendents. She always followed her father’s advice, “If you know it’s right, do it.” José Angel Gutiérrez, the famous civil rights leader, chronicle’s Lara’s ascent from a willful child to the mayor of Crystal City. From her father’s doting support to her mother’s steel-rod discipline, Gutiérrez offers a detailed portrait of the early family life of the woman whose continuing struggle against segregation and discrimination began while she was still a high school student in Crystal City. He also follows her attempts as a single mother to achieve her dream of being a doctor and providing for her sons. This is the story of la cabezuda, Severita Lara, who has made an indelible imprint on American history.

The Santero’s Miracle: A Bilingual Story

In this bilingual story of faith, Don Jacobo has a dream that, in the end, is a reminder that miracles do happen. Jacobo is teaching his visiting grandson Andrés how to become a santero. Christmas is coming, snow is falling in the village, and the two are working on a carving of San Isidro, the patron saint of farmers. The half-finished carving stands in the living room beside the two oxen and the angel that don Jacobo carved earlier in the month. The snow-covered mountains are beautiful, but the road to the village is impassable. Andrés’s parents will not be able to get to the house for the holiday, and Jacobo’s neighbor Leopoldo is desperately ill but cannot get to the hospital. Then comes Jacobo’s dream; San Isidro is plowing with the two oxen and the angel is helping. \”But we don’t plow ’til April\” don Jacobo muses upon awakening. \”What does it mean?\” The night had been bitterly cold and don Jacobo must bundle up to go to the barn to feed his cows and chickens. As he steps outside, he can hardly believe his eyes. The snow-packed road is clear. Rudolfo Anaya’s story of the power of faith, hope, and love will be enjoyed by readers of all ages.

Americas Award For Children’s And Young Adult Literature. Commended (Awards)

Abuelita Full Of Life/Abuelita Llena De Vida

abuelitaJose is not sure what to expect when his grandmother from Mexico moves in…except that he will certainly have to change his ways. What he discovers is that he doesn’t mind one bit. Abuelita is full of surprises! She is full of life!

Carlos And The Cornfield / Carlos Y La Milpa De Maiz (Carlos Series)

In this delightful sequel to “Carlos y la Planta de Calabaza”, Carlos is told by his father that “you reap what you sow”. After some humorous experiences, Carlos comes to understand the rewards of hard work and learns a valuable lesson in listening. Full color.

See the review at WOW Review, Volume 8, Issue 4