Who Belongs Here?

In this probing, plain-spoken book, based on a true story, Margy Burns Knight and Anne Sibley O’Brien, author and illustrator of the acclaimed “Talking Walls,” invite young readers to explore the human implications of intolerance. Anecdotes relating the experiences of other refugees and their contributions to American culture play counterpoint to Nary’s tale, all enlivened by O’Brien’s full-color pastels. A compendium at the end of the book offers more detailed information about Pol, Pot, Ellis Island, and other topics in this text.

Eat The Sky, Drink The Ocean

These are just a few of the stories told in Eat the Sky, Drink the Ocean, a feminist speculative fiction collection, born of a collaboration between Australian and Indian writers. Finding themselves inspired to action after crimes against women dominated national conversations, the editors of this collection paired writers and illustrators from India and Australia together to write stories, graphic novels, and even a play that reimagine what girls can be and see themselves as.

Brazen

With her characteristic wit and dazzling drawings, celebrated graphic novelist Pénélope Bagieu profiles the lives of these feisty female role models, some world famous, some little known. From Nellie Bly to Mae Jemison or Josephine Baker to Naziq al-Abid, the stories in this comic biography are sure to inspire the next generation of rebel ladies.

Where Will I Live?

This stunning photo essay takes a look at the thousands of children around the world who have been forced to flee war, terror, hunger and natural disasters, young refugees on the move with very little left except questions. It’s hard to imagine, but the images here will help unaffected children understand not only what this must feel like, but also how very lucky they are. The final message is that children, even with uncertain futures, are resilient and can face uncertainty with optimism. With images from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

They Lost Their Heads!: What Happened to Washington’s Teeth, Einstein’s Brain, and Other Famous Body Parts

From the kidnapping of Einstein’s brain to the horrifying end of Louis XIV’s heart, the mysteries surrounding some of history’s most famous body parts range from medical to macabre. Carlyn Beccia explores the misadventures of noteworthy body parts through history and uses them as springboards for exploring topics such as forensics, DNA testing, brain science, organ donation, and cloning. The engaging, conversational tone of the text, the wonderfully creepy subject matter, and the delightfully detailed art are sure to capture even the most reluctant readers. The famous people and their body parts include: Galileo Galilei / Fingers ; Louis XIV / Heart ; George Washington / Teeth ; Franz Hayden / Head ; Beethoven / Hair ; Abraham Lincoln / Body ; Cheng and Eng Bunker / Liver ; Phineas Gage / Skull ; John Wilkes Booth / Neck vertebrae ; Vincent Van Gogh / Ear ; Sarah Bernhardt / Leg ; Mata Hari / Head ; Albert Einstein / Brain ; Elvis Presley / Wart ; Thomas Edison / Last Breath.

Disappearing Acts

Disappearing Acts is a beautifully illustrated search-and-find book. Each page features a densely detailed landscape: rainforest, savannah, coral reef, and more. Within these landscapes are hiding threatened species such as the Adelie penguin, elephant, panda, and snow leopard, and children are invited to search the picture to find each one. Alongside each illustration run descriptions of the animals, their numbers, their habitats, and why they are endangered. At the back of the book an index of animals provides further context. Isabella Bunnell’s warm, intricate watercolors provide a delightful way to learn about our planet’s rich diversity and fragile ecosystems.

Flying Colors

By exploring the designs of flags, we can learn all about the histories and aspirations of the countries they represent. Did you know that only the flag of Nepal has more than four sides? Or that the flag of Mozambique features a book, a hoe and an AK47? Robert Fresson’s vintage-inflected illustrations shed fresh light on the wonders of vexillology.