The 91-Story Treehouse

New York Times-bestselling team Andy Griffiths and Terry Denton invite readers to come hang out with them in their 91-Story Treehouse—the seventh book in the illustrated chapter book series filled with Andy and Terry’s signature slapstick humor!Andy and Terry live in a 91-story treehouse. (It used to be a 78-story treehouse, but they keep getting ideas for new stories!) It has a submarine sandwich shop that serves sandwiches the size of actual submarines, an air-traffic control tower, a human pinball machine, a spin-and-win prize wheel, a giant spider web—with a giant spider!— and a big red button, which they’re not sure whether to push or not because they can’t remember what it does. Good thing there’s so many fun things to do in the treehouse, because Andy and Terry get stuck babysitting Mr. Big Nose’s three grandchildren for the day. After all, how much trouble could they possibly get into in just one day?Praise for Andy Griffiths and the Treehouse series:”Anarchic absurdity at its best. . . . Denton’s manic cartooning captures every twist and turn in hilarious detail.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review, on The 13-Story Treehouse”Will appeal to fans of Jeff Kinney and Dav Pilkey. . . . The wonderfully random slapstick humor is tailor-made for reluctant readers. . . . A treat for all.” —Booklist on The 13-Story Treehouse”Twice the treehouse, twice the fun? You bet. . . . Denton’s furiously scrawled line drawings milk the silly, gross-out gags for everything they’re worth. Kids should be flipping pages faster than a pair of inflatable underpants can skyrocket the young heroes to safety.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review, on The 26-Story TreehouseRead the whole series!The 13-Story TreehouseThe 26-Story TreehouseThe 39-Story TreehouseThe 52-Story TreehouseThe 65-Story TreehouseThe 78-Story TreehouseThe 91-Story Treehouse

Dingo

Dingo leaves her sleeping pups with her mate and lifts her head to smell the air. Dusk is a busy time — the time for hunting. Softly and fleetly she runs through the forest, past a possum, a wombat, and kangaroos in the gully below. Now she climbs to the highest point and sniffs again, locating the scent of rabbits in the wind. Interspersed with text offering facts for curious readers, Dingo is a lyrical foray into the life of these fascinating wild dogs.

Archie And The Bear

A very small boy in a bear suit and a very large bear in a boy suit share the fun of pretending, adventuring in the woods, and a honey sandwich next to a warm fire on a cold day. Which is really the boy, and which is the bear? It doesn’t matter—you are who you say you are. With minimal text and bold, dramatic illustrations, this picture book offers a thought-provoking take on identity and brings a fresh vision to the theme of finding connections hidden behind visual differences.

Dad’s Camera

One day Dad comes home with one of those old cameras, the kind that uses film. But he doesn’t take photos of the regular things people photograph. He takes pictures of his keys, his coffee cup, the objects scattered on his desk. He starts doing a lot of things that are hard to understand, like putting items that belong in the fridge in the cupboard and ones that belong in the cupboard in the fridge. In a sensitive, touching tale about losing a family member to a terminal illness, Ross Watkins and Liz Anelli prove that love is the one thing that can never be forgotten.

The Patchwork Bike

When you live at the edge of the no-go desert, you need to make your own fun. That’s when you and your brothers get inventive and build a bike from scratch, using everyday items like an old milk pot (maybe Mum is using it, maybe not), a bent bucket seat, and bashed tin-can handles. The end result is a spectacular bike, perfect for going bumpetty bump over the sand hills, past your fed-up mum, and right through your mud-for-walls home.

The Stars At Oktober Bend

Alice is fifteen, with hair as red as fire and skin as pale as bone. Something inside Alice is broken: she remembers words but struggles to speak them. Still, Alice knows words are for sharing, so she pins them to posters in tucked-away places: railway waiting rooms, fish-and-chip shops, quiet corners. Manny is sixteen, with a scar from shoulder to elbow. Something inside Manny is broken: he was once a child soldier, forced to do terrible, violent things. But in a new land with new people who will care for him, he spends time exploring on foot. And in his pocket, he carries a poem he scooped up. And he knows the words by heart. When Manny and Alice meet, their relationship brings the beginning of love and healing.