Imagining Geronimo

His face has appeared on T-shirts, postage stamps, jigsaw puzzles, posters and an Andy Warhol print. A celebrity and a tourist attraction who attended three World’s Fairs and rode in President Theodore Roosevelt’s inaugural parade, he is a character in such classic westerns as Stagecoach and Broken Arrow. His name was used in the daring military operation that killed Osama bin Laden in 2011, and rumors about the location of his skull at a Yale University club have circulated for a century. These are just a few of the ways that the Apache shaman and war leader known to Anglo-Americans as Geronimo has remained alive in the mainstream American imagination and beyond.

The Witches Of Ruidoso


In the last years of the nineteenth century, in the western territory that would become New Mexico, two young people become constant companions. They roam the ancient country of mysterious terrain, where the mountain looms and reminds them of their insignificance, and observe the eccentric characters in the village: Mr. Blackwater, known as “No Leg Dancer” by the Apaches because of the leg he lost in the War Between the States and his penchant for blowing reveille on his bugle each morning; their friend, Two Feather, the Mescalero Apache boy who takes Beth Delilah to meet his wise old grandfather who sees mysterious things; and Senora Roja, who everyone believes is a bruja, or witch, and who they know to be vile and evil.

Apache Children and Elders Talk Together

In a world of latchkey kids, these books provide an extended family for readers. They provide participation in the community and traditions of some of the most revered and respected peoples in American history. Learn the importance of community and family, the incredible impact of elders as role models, and the value of keeping traditions alive in these magnificently photographed books.