Azteca: The Story Of A Jaguar Warrior

In 15th-century Mexico, Tlilcatl, the Jaguar Warrior, battles the Spanish conquistadores for his family, culture, and empire in this graphic novel for children and adults. In both Spanish and English. Ages 8 and up.

Iguanas In The Snow / Iguanas En La Nieve: And Other Winter Poems / Y Otros Poemas De Invierno

This collection invites us to celebrate winter — by the seashore, in the city of San Francisco, and in the ancient redwood forests of the Sierras. We see a city where people have become bridges to each other and children sing in two languages. A family frolic in the snow reminds the poet of the iguanas playing by his grandmother’s house in Mexico. The seedling redwoods promise tomorrow. Maya Christina Gonzalez creates a spirited family of children and adults making their way through lively settings.

Butterflies On Carmen Street/ Mariposas En La Calle Carmen

butterflies\”Today is Butterfly Day!\” Julianita excitedly tells her grandfather as they make their way down Carmen Street to school one morning. Today is the day Julianita and her friends have been waiting for–they\’re going to learn about monarch butterflies. But what\’s even more thrilling is they\’re each going to receive their very own caterpillar to raise! When Julianita gets hers, she names him Tiger because of his striking yellow and black stripes. Ms. Rodríguez teaches her students all about the monarch. But Julianita already knows that they fly south thousands of miles every winter because her grandfather remembers seeing the beautiful monarchs in his village in the highlands of Mexico. As the children feed and care for their caterpillars, they anxiously anticipate the transformation from caterpillar to chrysalis to butterfly. When Tiger finally emerges from his chrysalis, Julianita doesn\’t want to let him go. She worries that he will get lost on his way to Mexico. \”Tiger knows the way to Mexico because it\’s in his heart,\” her Abuelito reassures her. She feels sad to see Tiger fly away, but Julianita knows that someday, she will follow him to her grandfather\’s magical Mexico. Paired with April Ward\’s charming illustrations that depict Julianita\’s neighborhood–her home on Carmen Street, the bench where Abuelito rests in Palo Verde Park, her parents\’ store that sells everything in the whole wide world–this book by award-winning author Monica Brown is sure to entertain and educate kids ages 3-9. This is a perfect choice for children learning about insects and the forces of nature.

Burro’s Tortillas

burro'sWhat do you get when you cross The Little Red Hen with a burro and his friends? Burro s Tortillas! In this humorous Southwestern retelling of a childhood favorite, Burro finds it difficult to get any help from his friends as he diligently works to turn corn into tortillas. Young children will love the repetition; older children will enjoy the book’s many puns. In addition to its Southwestern flavor, the delightful story imparts an accurate picture of the traditional way that tortillas are made. A Spanish/English glossary and a simple recipe for making tortillas are included in the For Creative Minds section.

Do You Know The Cucuy? / ¿cocones Al Cucuy?

“The Cucuy is a tall, furry, three-eyed, four-armed monster with a mouth full of huge teeth,” Papo tells his granddaughter. And, he warns, if she doesn’t behave, the Cucuy will take her away! She used to be afraid of the Cucuy, until one day she meets him and learns that he is not the frightful beast her grandfather described. Instead, he’s cute and likes to play. His fur is blue, and his teeth are small. He may not be just like her, but he does have two arms and two eyes. And the Cucuy also likes to play catch, blow bubbles, and eat candy. Best of all, though, the young girl learns that he doesn’t kidnap naughty children! First-time children’s book author Claudia Galindo and illustrator Jonathan Coombs vividly bring to life a character known to generations of Latino children. Although this time, the Cucuy isn’t a scary monster but instead is a fun playmate.

Dona Flor: A Tall Tale About A Giant Woman With A Great Big Heart (Pura Belpre Medal Book Illustrator (Awards))

Doña Flor is a giant woman who lives in a puebla with lots of families. She loves her neighbors–she lets the children use her flowers for trumpets, and the families use her leftover tortillas for rafts. So when a huge puma is terrifying the village, of course Flor is the one to investigate. Featuring Spanish words and phrases throughout, as well as a glossary, Pat Mora’s story, along with Raúl Colón’s glorious artwork, makes this a treat for any reader, tall or small. Award-winning author Pat Mora’s previous book with Raúl Colón, Tomás and the Library Lady, received the Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book Award, an IRA Teacher’s Choice Award, a Skipping Stones Award, and was also named a Texas Bluebonnet Award Master List title and an Americas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature commended title. She lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Count on Culebra: Go from 1 to 10 in Spanish

A companion to the popular Manana, Iguana that teaches how to count in spanish. When Iguana stubs her toe, Doctor Culebra comes to the rescue. But his suggestions sound a little loco to everyone else. How will tying un rolling pin and dos kettles to Iguana’s tail make her better? And more importantly, will Iguana feel well enough to make her cactus butter dulces? The extremely popular “Manana, Iguana” has sold and reprinted quickly, and Ann Whitford Paul and Ethan Long’s previous titles have received much praise.

Chato And The Party Animals

chatoChato, the coolest cat in el barrio, loves to party–but not his best buddy, Novio Boy. Birthday parties always make him blue. “I’m from the pound,” he tells Chato. “I don’t know when I was born. I never knew my mami. I never even had a birthday party, or nothing.”So Chato plans the coolest surprise party for Novio Boy, inviting all of el barrio, and cooking up a storm. But he forgets the most important thing–inviting Novio Boy! Luckily, just as everyone starts remembering all the things they used to love about their long-lost friend, the birthday boy arrives with his own surprise–himself!In a starred review, Publishers Weekly called Chato’s Kitchen “Wickedly funny…Guevara’s cats are delicious send-ups of barrio characters, and Soto’s words glisten with wit. Salud to this magical pairing of talents.”

Any Small Goodness: A Novel of the Barrio

In this quiet, gentle novella reminiscent of Sarah, Plain and Tall, award-winning picture book writer Tony Johnston creates a moving story about a loving Chicano family in East LA. Filled with love, hope, and the exquisite beauty of a very special community, Tony Johnston¹s first novel is a warm and memorable gem.