La Cola De Caballo De Estefania

A little girl who is determined to strike a blow for nonconformity manages to arrive at school every day with a hairdo more outraegous than the day before. And each time, the cast of copycats grows and grows–until the day she threatens to shave her head! The strong female voice will speak to many, asserting the importance of individuality and independent thought. Full color.

Look Out Kindergarten, Here I Come/Preparate, Kindergarten! Alla Voy!

Nancy Carlson’s reassuring picture book about getting ready for kindergarten is now available in a Spanish-English edition—and to a whole new audience of young children. The simple, comforting text and big, bright illustrations will ease first-day-of-school jitters and help make the early days of kindergarten exciting and fun.

Yo, Naomi Leon

Naomi Soledad Leon Outlaw has had a lot to contend with in her young life, her name for a start. Then, there are her clothes (sewn in polyester by Gram), her difficulty speaking up, and her status at school as “nobody special.” But according to Gram, most problems can be overcome with positive thinking. And with Gram and her little brother, Owen, life at Avocado Acres Trailer Rancho in California is happy and peaceful…until their mother reappears after seven years, stirring up all sorts of questions and challenging Naomi to discover who she really is.

Spanish title: Yo, Naomi Leon

Naomi Soledad Leon Outlaw ha tenido que enfrentarse a mucho en su corta vida, empezando por su nombre. Tambien esta el problema de su ropa (hechas por su abuela en tela de poliester), su timidez y la fama que tiene en la escuela de no ser nadie especial. Pero segun su abuela, la mayoria de los problemas se solucionan con mentalidad positiva. Y su vida, junto a su abuela y su pequeno hermano, Owen, en el parque de casas moviles Avocado Acres, es tranquila y feliz… hasta que su mama aparece luego de siete anos, creando confusion y retando a Naomi a que averigue quien es.

Zora Hurston Y El Arbol Sonador / Zora Hurston And The Chinaberry Tree (Spanish Edition)

Zora’s father thinks she should wear dresses instead of overalls and leave tree climbing and dreaming of big cities to boys. But her mother teaches Zora that dreams, like new tree branches, are always within reach. “Emphasizes the awareness of family, nature, and community that is reflected in [Hurston’s] writing.” — The New York Times Book Review