A Collection Of Rudyard Kipling’s Just So Stories

In this gorgeous collection featuring eight of Kipling’s JUST SO STORIES, each tale is illustrated by a different leading contemporary artist.How did the rude Rhinoceros get his baggy skin? How did a ‘satiably curious Elephant change the lives of his kin evermore? First told aloud to his young daughter (“O my Best Beloved”), Rudyard Kipling’s inspired answers to these and other burning questions draw from the fables he heard as a child in India and the folktales he gathered from around the world.

Just So Stories (Books Of Wonder)

How did the camel get his hump? How did the leopard get his spots? How did the elephant get his trunk? These are questions that children around the world have asked for centuries, but it took Nobel Prize winner Rudyard Kipling’s lively, hilarious stories to give them answers. For one hundred years, these classic tales, drawn from the oral storytelling traditions of India and Africa and filled with mischievously clever animals and people, have entertained young and old alike.Intertwined within these delightful tales are little pearls of wisdom about the pitfalls of arrogance and pride and the importance of curiosity, imagination, and inventiveness.

Sona and the Wedding Game

Sona’s big sister is getting married and she’s been given an important job to do. She has to steal the groom’s shoes. She’s never attended a wedding before, so she’s unfamiliar with this Indian tradition as well as many of the other magical experiences that will occur before and during the special event. But with the assistance of her annoying cousin Vishal, Sona finds a way to steal the shoes and get a very special reward.

Bombay Blues

Dimple Lala thought that growing up would give her all the answers, but instead she has more questions than ever. Her boyfriend is distant, her classmates are predictable, and a blue mood has settled around the edges of everything she does. It’s time for a change, and a change is just what Dimple is going to get — of scenery, of cultures, of mind. She thinks she’s heading to Bombay for a family wedding — but really she is plunging into the unexpected, the unmapped, and the uncontrollable. The land of her parents and ancestors has a lot to reveal to her — for every choice we make can crescendo into a jour­ney, every ending can turn into a beginning, and each person we meet can show us something new about ourselves.

Do!

Do! is a set of action pictures rendered in the elegantly minimalist Warli style of tribal art. It introduces basic verbs to the young reader through a series of delicately drawn pictograms, which both illustrate the verb and tell a further string of stories. Every page or pair of pages invites the child to explore a busy world and make up her own tales. The art conjures up a world teeming with human figures, animals, plants, and birds.

The illustrations in Do! were made by people belonging to a tribal community in Maharashtra, in western India. Ramesh Hengadi, Rasika Hengadi, Shantaram Dhadpe, and Kusum Dhadpe are the artists featured in this book.

Do! was conceived of by Gita Wolf, who has written more than seventeen books for children and adults. A highly original and creative voice in contemporary Indian publishing, she has pursued her interest in exploring and experimenting with the form of the book and its status as a revered cultural object.