Sister Rabbit’s Tricks

Sister Rabbit enjoys visiting her friends and relatives in the forest. She also enjoys playing tricks on the other animals, and sometimes Rabbit’s tricks get her into trouble.

Inspired by the many rabbit stories from the pueblos of New Mexico, this story of Sister Rabbit and her antics shows us a trickster animal, wily and lovable, who can fool her friends but needs to learn some lessons about how to get along in life.

Apache Children and Elders Talk Together

In a world of latchkey kids, these books provide an extended family for readers. They provide participation in the community and traditions of some of the most revered and respected peoples in American history. Learn the importance of community and family, the incredible impact of elders as role models, and the value of keeping traditions alive in these magnificently photographed books.

High Riders, Saints and Death Cars: A Life Saved by Art

Nicholas Herrera started life as a mischievous, dyslexic boy, born into one of the old Spanish families of New Mexico. Bad teachers and poor schooling helped him to lose himself in drugs, drinking, riding motorcycles and driving fast cars. A near-death experience, a wonderful mother and a fascination with making art saved him. Today Nicholas Herrera is one of the most noted Santeros in the US. His work is displayed in folk-art galleries across the country and is collected by the Smithsonian. He is noted for the highly personal, political nature of his work and his innovative treatment of what can sometimes be a rather bland art form designed to sell to tourists. His work is intensely personal and even confessional. A survivor of alcoholism and drug addiction, which almost led to his death in a terrible car crash, Herrera is now sober and remarkably productive. His art is his life and his life is his art. Extraordinarily charismatic, Herrera is the grandson, nephew and son of artists. His young daughter is now following in his footsteps.

Tortilla Sun

When twelve-year-old Izzy discovers a beat-up baseball marked with the words ‘Because magic’ while unpacking in yet another new apartment, she is determined to figure out what it means. What secrets does this old ball have to tell? Her mom certainly isn’t sharing any especially when it comes to Izzy’s father, who died before Izzy was born. But when she spends the summer in her Nana’s remote New Mexico village, Izzy discovers long-buried secrets that come alive in an enchanted landscape of watermelon mountains, whispering winds, and tortilla suns. Infused with the flavor of the southwest and sprinkled with just a pinch of magic, this heartfelt middle grade debut is as rich and satisfying as Nana’s homemade enchiladas.