Kamakwie: Finding Peace, Love, and Injustice in Sierra Leone

Kathleen Martin spent several weeks in the tiny village of Kamakwie in the interior of Sierra Leone, where she worked with a Canadian medical team. Staying in the grounds of the community hospital, Kathleen had the opportunity to meet with the people of the village. The experience was a revelation. Her mission was to talk to people about their lives, aspirations and their memories of the civil war. She also had a camera though which she developed a visual chronicle. Above all, she was struck by the children. Their resilience, their hopes, their enjoyment of the moments when they could gather and sing and play soccer.
Initially, the writer is an observer, but it is not long before the observer is passionately involved.
In this vivid and moving account of her time in Kamakwie, Kathleen Martin provides a window into a world far from the comfortable lives of most Americans – a world that through this book will become a colorful, sometimes horrifying, sometimes beautiful reality.

Storm Singing and Other Tangled Tasks

Helen and her fabled-beast friends help Rona the selkie in a Storm Singer competition. Rona wins by singing up an incredible storm, but part of the prize is to represent the selkies in a much bigger contest. Rona must compete in three gruelling challenges against a mermaid and a blue loon, and carry an important message between the deep sea powers, which will stop them going to war. She desperately needs the help of Helen and her friends. But a giant jellyfish and a terrifying conger eel are among those who will do anything to stop the message of peace getting through. Fans of Helen’s first two adventures will be eagerly awaiting this third thrilling instalment. Set in the north of Scotland, this story introduces yet more fabled beasts inspired by Scottish sea creatures and folklore.

Refugee Boy

Fourteen-year-old Alem Kelo adjusts to life as a foster child seeking asylum in London, while his Eritrean mother and Ethiopian father work for peace between their homelands in Africa.

The Unknown Spy

Danny Caulfield’s quiet Christmas break from Wilsons Academy, the school for spies, is shattered by gunshots and a heartrending discovery about his parents, and he is called back to Wilsons to prepare to go undercover to protect the Treaty Stone that keeps peace between the Upper and Lower Worlds.

Sharing Our Homeland: Palestinian and Jewish Children at Summer Peace Camp

Photo-essay focusing on two Israeli children, one Jewish and one Palestinian, who, in spite of their differences and the longstanding conflicts in the region, learn to play, work, and share ideas together at Summer Peace Camp, a day camp located in Israel.

A Little Peace

The latest National Geographic Children’s Books title by Barbara Kerley, A Little Peace, gives a richly evocative and thought-provoking view of the world our children will inherit. Wise words and moving images offer a unique and enriching experience for every young reader. According to author Barbara Kerley, “I believe that peace doesn’t just rest in the hands of politicians and world leaders. We all have the power to make the world more peaceful.”The book juxtaposes photographs from around the world with a simple, reflective message about our responsibilities for finding and keeping peace on the planet. Like the highly acclaimed titles A Cool Drink of Water and You and Me Together, this beautiful children’s picture book features superb National Geographic images accompanied by a brief, poetic text on a subject of global importance. All the photography is reproduced in miniature at the back of the book with geographic, historic, and cultural context and details explained. A world map leads readers to the location of each image. A Little Peace offers a vital lesson for children everywhere.

Peace Tales

Maybe it’s the king who spills honey, and then says it is not his problem until it causes a war. Or maybe it’s some sandpipers and whales who get into a foolish fight that almost destroys their homes. Perhaps it’s the man who thinks that a gun makes him strong, or the monkeys who follow their leader into water that’s too deep.