Motion, Magnets and More

Where do the bubbles come from in a piece of cake? Why do triangles make a structure stronger? And how come magnets don’t stick to the wall? This colorful and straightforward introduction to the physical sciences gives young readers an easy-to-understand overview of such concepts as materials, forces, structures, solids, liquids and gases. Explanations are accompanied by simple, fun activities, including building a structure out of dried spaghetti and inflating a balloon with a gas made by combining vinegar and baking soda. Parents and teachers will find more explanations, activity ideas and a helpful glossary in the back.

A Native American Thought Of It: Amazing Inventions And Innovations (We Thought Of It)

nativeInventiveness and ingenuity from North America’s First Nations.Everyone knows that moccasins, canoes and toboggans were invented by the Aboriginal people of North America, but did you know that they also developed their own sign language, as well as syringe needles and a secret ingredient in soda pop?Depending on where they lived, Aboriginal communities relied on their ingenuity to harness the resources available to them. Some groups, such as the Iroquois, were particularly skilled at growing and harvesting food. From them, we get corn and wild rice, as well as maple syrup.Other groups, including the Sioux and Comanche of the plains, were exceptional hunters. Camouflage, fish hooks and decoys were all developed to make the task of catching animals easier. And even games-lacrosse, hockey and volleyball — have Native American roots.Other clever inventions and innovations include: Diapers Asphalt Megaphones Hair conditioner Surgical knives Sunscreen.With descriptive photos and information-packed text, this book explores eight different categories in which the creativity of First Nations peoples from across the continent led to remarkable inventions and innovations, many of which are still in use today.

Into The Unknown

Ready to relive some of the most daring voyages of all time? Unfold these spectacular cross sections and explore fourteen historic journeys. Open this dynamic book and discover how the greatest explorers in history from Marco Polo to Neil Armstrong plunged into the unknown and boldly pieced together the picture of the world we have today. With the help of masterful cross sections, dramatic storytelling, and sidebars that highlight key concepts, places, and technology, immerse yourself in such expeditions as: Leif Eriksson’s voyage to North America (eleventh century) Zheng He’s travels from China to East Africa (fifteenth century) Magellan’s circumnavigation of the globe (sixteenth century) Tenzing Norgay’s and Edmund Hillary’s scaling of Mt. Everest (twentieth century) Plus ten more exciting journeys!

Human.4

Humanity, like computers, can be upgraded. And old versions disappear. At some unspecified point in the future, when technology is as advanced as possible and we are a race of super beings, some old audio tapes are discovered. On the tapes is the story of fourteen-year-old Kyle Straker. Hypnotized, Kyle missed the upgrade of humanity to 1.0. He isn’t compatible with the new technology. And through the recording, he narrates what the upgrades really mean. And it’s absolutely terrifying. Sci-fi futuristic and technological apocalypse in the style of War of the Worlds, I am Legend and The X-Files.

What Came First?

When was the Earth created and how? And the most pressing question of all — how did humans come to be? What Came First? is a funny but scientifically sound introduction to evolution. Learn about the Big Bang, where it all started, and read vivid descriptions of a melting pot full of microscopic organisms — the very beginnings of life — to the first oceanic life forms and, with the formation of the continents, the first land mammals, all the way through to the evolution of the plant, animal, and human life that surrounds us today.

Cycle of Rice, Cycle of Life: A Story of Sustainable Farming

On the island of Bali in Southeast Asia, rice farming is a way of life. The people live in tune with the natural rhythms and cycles of the water and the soil. Ingrained in their community and culture, rice farming connects them to the land and one another. Balinese farmers have planted rice using an intricate system of water sharing and crop rotation for more than a thousand years. Intertwined with their spiritual, social, and day-to-day lives, this system has made Bali a leading producer of one of the world’s most important crops. And because Balinese rice farming respects the balances of nature, it serves as a remarkable example of sustainable agriculture in an increasingly industrialized world. With lush photographs and captivating text, Jan Reynolds explores the traditional world of rice farming on the beautiful island of Bali. Readers of all ages will come away with an enhanced awareness of how we farm, eat, and live today, and the effects these practices have on the world of tomorrow.

Dolphins In Danger (Adventures Of Riley)

Riley travels to the South Pacific island of Moorea with his Uncle Max, Aunt Martha, and Cousin Alice. Their mission is to study spinner dolphins while basking in the warmth and charm of Polynesian culture. However, things take a turn for the worse when several dolphins become trapped in a local lagoon! Riley holds the key to their survival, but between surfing lessons and close encounters with humpback whales, will he realize it in time?

Man on the Moon: (A Day in the Life of Bob)

Presents a typical day in the life of Bob, the man on the moon, who rockets to work each morning, cleans up after the astronauts, and performs other duties before returning home for a bath and bed.