Lullaby and Good Night: Songs for Sweet Dreams

It’s bedtime, that special time when parents tuck their little ones in for the night and lull them to sleep with their favorite lullabies. In this gorgeous book, author-illustrator Julie Downing has selected her favorite lullabies and illustrated each one with expressive watercolor paintings. Parents will delight in the familiar, soothing rhythms of beloved songs like “Rock-a-bye Baby,” “Kumbaya,” and “Lullaby and Good Night,” while little ones are enchanted by fresh and dreamy lullabies, such as “El Coquí” and “Wynken, Blynken and Nod.” Each lavish illustration celebrates the precious moments shared between a parent and child, from sighting the first evening star together to sharing a last good-night kiss. Music is included for each lullaby so that parents can sing their young ones to sleep.

Oliver Who Would Not Sleep

Oliver Donnington Rimington-Sneep COULDN’T and DIDN’T and WOULD NOT SLEEP! And why should he? As soon as his parents shut his door, Oliver’s off on all kinds of explorations: painting and reading, drawing and racing — and a little trip to Mars for good measure. But his explorations end where all explorations should: safe at home, in a warm bed . . . asleep. For every parent with an Oliver (or Olivia) in their lives, and every child seeking a little fun before shut-eye, OLIVER WHO WOULD NOT SLEEP is the perfect bedtime adventure.

28 Good Night Stories

Whenever children want “just one more story” at bedtime, here is a beautiful anthology of all-new good-night stories that will fit the bill. At 128 pages, this book can accommodate. It’s full of imaginative and dreamy stories that are perfect for lulling your little ones to sleep.

Eve Tharlet’s adorable illustrations complement a wide range of authors’ voices, and there’s something in here for everyone. You’ll want to keep it on the bedside table.

Tuko and the Birds: A Tale from the Philippines

Life was peaceful on the small Philippine island of Luzon. The men fished, the women cooked, the children played games, and the birds sang. Everyone knew it was time for bed when they heard the birds’ good-night song. Then Tuko arrived. Tuko, the gecko, bellowed his name five times every time he ate—day or night. Everyone was miserable from lack of sleep. That is, until Haribon the eagle devised a plan to trick Tuko into leaving for good.