The Bossy Gallito\Gallo De Bodas

In this cumulative Cuban folktale, a bossy rooster dirties his beak when he eats a kernel of corn and must find a way to clean it before his parrot uncle’s wedding. Includes a glossary of Spanish words and information about the different birds in the story.

Join the discussion of The Bossy Gallito as well as other books set in Cuba on our My Take/Your Take page.

The Scarecrows’ Wedding

Betty O’Barley and Harry O’Hay are planning the best wedding the barnyard has ever seen. But when Harry sets off to fetch some flowers for his bride-to-be, the wicked scarecrow Reginald Rake tries to take his place.

The Kingdom Of Little Wounds

On the eve of Princess Sophia’s wedding, the Scandinavian city of Skyggehavn prepares to fete the occasion with a sumptuous display of riches: brocade and satin and jewels, feasts of sugar fruit and sweet spiced wine. Yet beneath the veneer of celebration, a shiver of darkness creeps through the palace halls. A mysterious illness plagues the royal family, threatening the lives of the throne’s heirs, and a courtier’s wolfish hunger for the king’s favors sets a devious plot in motion. Here in the palace at Skyggehavn, things are seldom as they seem — and when a single errant prick of a needle sets off a series of events that will alter the course of history, the fates of seamstress Ava Bingen and mute nursemaid Midi Sorte become irrevocably intertwined with that of mad Queen Isabel. As they navigate a tangled web of palace intrigue, power-lust, and deception, Ava and Midi must carve out their own survival any way they can.

Nadia’s Hands

A Pakistani-American girl takes part in her aunt’s traditional Pakistani wedding.

Here Comes Our Bride!: An African Wedding Story

The stunning sights and sounds of a Nigerian wedding are vividly brought to life in Ifeoma Onyefulu’s new picture book. The different traditions and customs of this African wedding are explored and explained through the eyes of one young spectator. We see the preparations made by the whole community in anticipation of the traditional African ceremony and second religious ceremony.

Night Letter

Anahita, a nomadic weaver living in early twentieth-century Iran, is kidnapped on the eve of her wedding and thrown into a world of slavery and the mystical Sufi faith in this fairytale-tinged story of a damsel in distress determined to save herself.

The Rooster Who Went to His Uncle’s Wedding

Rooster, en route to his uncle’s wedding, struggles with the dilemma of whether he should risk of getting dirty in order to obtain a kernel of corn. His hunger overcomes his better judgment and, of course, he winds up “. . . with a beak full of mud.” This leads into a cumulative tale that will be familiar to anyone who knows “The Old Woman and Her Pig” or any number of its variants. In this case, his quest to get clean is nicely circular: the sun, just coming up as the book begins, is the one who agrees to break the chain of refusal, to repay the rooster for greeting him each morning.

Join the discussion of The Rooster Who Went to His Uncle’s Wedding as well as other books set in Cuba on our My Take/Your Take page.

Here Comes the Bride

Filomena is a seamstress who spends her days creating gorgeous wedding dresses for many lovely brides. And when it’s finally her turn to be the one to walk down the aisle, she can hardly contain herself. She gets right to work, putting her heart and soul into making her dress. But Filomena gets carried away. She adds so many frills, feathers and lace that her groom barely recognizes the girl he loves. Here Comes the Bride is a story about staying true to your inner beauty.