Terezin

Through inmates’ own voices and artwork, Terezin explores the lives of Jewish people in one of the most infamous of the Nazi transit camps. Between 1941 and 1945, Nazi Germany turned the small town of Terezin, Czechoslovakia, into a ghetto, and then into a transit camp for thousands of Jewish people. It was a “show” camp, where inmates were forced to use their artistic talents to fool the world about the truth of gas chambers and horrific living conditions for imprisoned Jews. Here is their story, told through the firsthand accounts of those who were there. In this accessible, meticulously researched book, Ruth Thomson allows the inmates to speak for themselves through secret diary entries, artwork, and excerpts from memoirs and recordings narrated after the war. Terezin: Voices from the Holocaust is a moving portrait that shows the strength of the human will to endure, to create, and to survive.

Arctic Adventures: Tales From The Lives Of Inuit Artists

Extreme weather, hunger, magic, hunting, and the land are themes that shape the existence of the Inuits’ of the Far North. These stories — retold by Raquel Rivera based on the lives of native artists Pudlo Pudlat, Jessie Oonark, Kenojuak Ashevak and Lazarusie Ishulutuk — offer young readers a glimpse into this rich, remote culture, past and present. In “Pudlo and Kapik Go Hunting,” a young boy drifts out to sea on an ice floe; “Oonark\’s Arctic Adventure” tells of a mother and daughter stranded on the icy tundra; “The Shaman’s Granddaughter” movingly explores loss and mystery; and “Lazarusie and the Polar Bears” reveals just how finely attuned the relationship between animals and humans can be. Accompanying each story are illustrations by Jirina Marton, who has spent time in the Arctic and whose deep appreciation for its subtle beauty shines through her art. In addition to the stories, there is a feature spread on each artist with a photograph, a brief biography, and a reproduction of one of the artist’s works.