A Big Bed For Little Snow

When winter comes, Mommy makes a soft bed for Little Snow to sleep on, but each night he cannot resist jumping on the bed, causing tiny feathers to fly down.

Where Did They Go?

In this search-and-find book from illustrator Emily Bornoff, readers try to spot the animals in various environments, from jungles to deserts to the Arctic. Emily Bornoff’s lovely patterns and the playful hide-and-seek elements make this a charming, interactive title with a fascinating nonfiction element—all the hidden animals are endangered. Learn where in the world they come from and what is being done to save them.

The Bear Who Wasn’t There

Bear’s search for himself doesn’t matter so much as the charm of Lavie’s storytelling voice as he narrates it . . . Erlbruch gives the bear big, puzzled-looking eyes and a lovable grin. He lives in a forest made of ornate trees seemingly lifted from vintage engravings, whose delicate lines play off Bear’s dumpy figure. Bear’s encounters with various characters—the Turtle Taxi, the Penultimate Penguin—feature gentle wordplay and Lewis Carroll–like paradoxes . . . Everything is new to Bear, and his discoveries will delight readers.

Open Up, Please!

Look at that little hamster in a cage, and the other animals, too—a bunny, a squirrel, a bird, a frog, and even a porcupine. All of these little animals want to play outside! Luckily, you, the reader, are in charge of the keys and have only to open the cages to make these critters happy. But wait—what’s in that box that you’re not supposed to touch? Uh-oh.

The Cow Tripped Over The Moon

Jumping over the moon is fine as long as you don’t trip and end up needing cow-size bandages. And having a blackbird peck off your nose can leave a person very sore indeed. Led along by bright, humorous illustrations and an energetic rhyming text, little readers will have fun guessing who the next Storyland victim might be, following hints like, “Who could be covered in egg?” and “Who went up and tumbled down?”

Emu

In the open eucalyptus forest of Australia, an emu as tall as a human settles down on his nest to warm and protect the eggs left by his mate. When they hatch, the chicks will be ten times bigger than domestic chicken hatchlings and covered in chocolate-and-cream stripes to provide camouflage in the grasslands. This unusual family sticks together until the hatchlings grow up, facing dangers that include eagles and dingoes.

See the review at WOW Review, Volume VIII, Issue 1.