The Romans

Meet Dormeo: gladiator, dormouse, berry-nibbler, and guide to ancient Rome. He’s about to lead a tour — from the temperamental gods and goddesses of Mount Olympus to the wolf-raised Romulus and Remus, from the birth of the Roman Republic to the death of Julius Caesar. On the way are fascinating glimpses of life as a Roman citizen, from families to festivals, gladiators to guards, as well as a look at some of Rome’s best-known emperors (good and not so good). Vibrant, engaging, and packed with Marcia Williams’s trademark warmth and humor, this graphic storybook is a young reader’s ideal introduction to the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.

A Hero’s Quest

Meet Decimus Rex, who has been kidnapped by slave-takers and taken to an arena in Rome. Decimus is intent on escaping from captivity, and knows he must outshine his fellow slaves and endure the trials set before him: crossing burning coals, hammers, spikes, and hand-to-hand combat. He never gives up his hope of escape . . . if he only knew that this is just the beginning of his troubles.

G Is For Gladiators

According to Roman legend, what famous twins were raised by a she-wolf? Who wrote the epic poem, The Aeneaid? What famous leader brought law and stability, yet was stabbed to death by a group of senators? Life in ancient Rome was certainly not for the faint of heart! In G is for Gladiator: An Ancient Rome Alphabet, readers are given an A-Z introduction to ancient Rome, including its social, political, and civil customs and practices. Husband-and-wife writing team Debbie and Michael Shoulders explore topics such as Roman law, architecture, mythology, and of course, the ultimate ‘fight club’ (gladiatorial combat). From the relaxed surroundings of the public baths to the rigid codes of the military legions, Rome’s ancient civilization is unveiled. Colorful, entertaining artwork from Victor Juhasz, the illustrator of Z is for Zeus: A Greek Mythology Alphabet, brings it all to vivid life.

Roman Diary: The Journal of Iliona of Mytilini: Who Was Captured and Sold As a Slave In Rome – Ad 107

Iliona never imagined that her sea voyage from Greece to Egypt would lead her to Rome. But when her ship is boarded by pirates, that’s where she ends up — as a slave. Separated from her brother, Apollo, Iliona is soon at the whim of her owners, and the chance of regaining freedom seems like a distant dream. But unlike her brother’s plight, Iliona’s life as a slave isn’t as bad as she feared: her new family provides clothing, food, and even schooling, and best of all, she is free to explore the wonders of Rome. S