Keepunumuk: Weeâchumun’s Thanksgiving Story

Wampanoag children listen as their grandmother tells them the story about how Weeâchumun (the wise Corn) asked local Native Americans to show the newcomers how to grow food to yield a good harvest–Keepunumuk–in 1621. The Thanksgiving story that most Americans know celebrates the Pilgrims. But without members of the Wampanoag tribe who already lived on the land where the Pilgrims settled, the Pilgrims would never have made it through their first winter. And without Weeâchumun (corn), the Native people wouldn’t have helped.

Coronavirus And Covid

What is Covid, and why is everyone talking about it? Engagingly illustrated by Axel Scheffler, this approachable and timely book – now newly updated for 2021 with the latest developments in vaccination and extra content about emotional wellbeing – helps answer these questions and many more. This new larger and expanded 32-page edition provides clear explanations about COVID-19 and its effects – both from a health perspective and the impact it has on a family’s day-to-day life.

Germy Science: The Sick Truth About Getting Sick (And Staying Healthy) (Gross Science)

This perfectly revolting — and perfectly timely! — introduction to germs from award-winning comedy writer Edward Kay will turn any kid into a master of microbes! Children get up close and personal with germs (ew!) in this entertaining, thoroughly researched exploration of the science and history of these tiny, ubiquitous creatures. Heavy on the gross factor to keep readers engaged, the book covers what germs are, how we get sick, how the human immune system works and the best ways to stay healthy. There are intriguing stories about early attempts to fight disease (heard about corpse catapults? how about shaved chicken butts?), and the plagues and pandemics that changed the course of history. A look to the future describes how germs may be helpful for cleaning the environment and solving crimes. It’s a kid-friendly overview that provides the perfect introduction to the world of germs.

Blue A History of the Color as Deep as the Sea & as Wide as the Sky

For centuries, blue powders and dyes were some of the most sought-after materials in the world. Ancient Afghan painters ground mass quantities of sapphire rocks to use for their paints, while snails were harvested in Eurasia for the tiny amounts of blue that their bodies would release. And then there was indigo, which was so valuable that American plantations grew it as a cash crop on the backs of African slaves. It wasn’t until 1905, when Adolf von Baeyer created a chemical blue dye, that blue could be used for anything and everything–most notably that uniform of workers everywhere, blue jeans. With stunning illustrations by Caldecott Honor Artist Daniel Minter, this vibrant and fascinating picturebook follows one color’s journey through time and across the world, as it becomes the blue we know today.

This book is the WOW Recommends: Book of the Month for November 2022.

Seasons-A Year in Nature

From the Arctic tundra to the African plains, the changing of the seasons keeps every creature and plant working together in perfect balance. Discover the sweet smells and sounds of the meadows in springtime, when the flowers and trees begin to bud and birds fill the skies. Marvel at the northern lights that illuminate the Arctic sky in the winter. Meet the underwater animals that live in boggy creeks in Australia during the summer. With simple facts about the wildlife and plants that change through every season, this is the perfect book for all nature lovers.

Soccer Atlas: A Journey Across The World And Onto The Field

Explore the histary of the beautiful game, get the low down on major tournaments and league, then travel to stan-out stadiums and meet some of the world’s top teams and superstar players.

I Have The Right To Save My Planet.

All children have the right to learn about the world, to celebrate the water, air and sunshine, and to be curious about the animals and plants that live on our planet. All children also have the right to learn about endangered species, to be concerned about plastic in the ocean, and to understand what a changing climate means for our Earth. What can children do to help? Told from the perspective of a child, this colorful and vibrant book explores what it means to be a child who dreams of a beautiful future for their planet.

Indivisible: African-Native American lives in the Americas

Throughout American history, people of combined African and Native American descent have often struggled for acceptance, not only from dominant cultures but also from their own communities. In this collection of twenty-seven groundbreaking essays, authors from across the Americas explore the complex personal histories and contemporary lives of people wth a dual heritage that has rarely received attention as part of the multicultural landscape.

Everything You Wanted To Know About Indians But Were Afraid To Ask

From the acclaimed Ojibwe author and professor Anton Treuer comes an essential book of questions and answers for Native and non-Native young readers alike. Ranging from “Why is there such a fuss about nonnative people wearing Indian costumes for Halloween?” to “Why is it called a ‘traditional Indian fry bread taco’?” to “What’s it like for natives who don’t look native?” to “Why are Indians so often imagined rather than understood?”, and beyond, Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians But Were Afraid to Ask (Young Readers Edition) does exactly what its title says for young readers, in a style consistently thoughtful, personal and engaging.