WOW Recommends: Book of the Month

WOW Recommends: Animals by the Numbers

Animals by the Numbers: A Book of Animal Infographics by Steve Jenkins
Book of the Month, January 2017
Animals by the Numbers: A Book of Animal Infographics by Steve Jenkins

The author/illustrator illuminates fascinating zoological information with infographics that compare and contrast scientific research. For example, one infographic shows that the biomass of all insects on the planet is more than the biomass of any other category of creatures. This book melds, art, science and math to demonstrate how to integrate the curriculum. -Recommended by Marilyn Carpenter
Continue reading

WOW Recommends: Book of the Month

WOW Recommends: Luis Paints the World

Luis Paints the World by Terry Farish
Book of the Month, December 2016
Luis Paints the World by Terry Farish with illustrations by Oliver Dominguez

Nico, Luis’ older brother is off to join the army and see the world. While Nico is gone, Luis decides to paint the world on an alleyway wall in their Latino neighborhood and is joined by his family and neighbors to create a colorful mural. Spanish words and descriptions of Dominican foods are sprinkled throughout the text contributing to the warm sense of community. -Recommended by Marilyn Carpenter
Continue reading

WOW Recommends: Book of the Month

WOW Recommends: Shepherd’s Crown

Shepherds Crown by Terry Pratchett
Book of the Month, November 2016
The Shepherd’s Crown: A Tiffany Aching Adventure by Terry Pratchett

The is the fifth and last fantasy tale about Tiffany, who has grown into a young woman and becomes a powerful and caring Head Witch. The Wee Free Men, 6-inch-tall blue men, zesty characters from the previous four books, join Tiffany to battle an invasion of the evil Fairies. Pratchett’s last book is a testimony to his belief that each person must make a difference in her world by helping others. -Recommended by Marilyn Carpenter
Continue reading

WOW Recommends: Book of the Month

WOW Recommends: Irena’s Children

Irena's Children: A True Story of Courage by Tilar J. Mazzeo
Book of the Month, October 2016
Irena’s Children: A True Story of Courage, Young Reader’s Edition by Tilar J. Mazzeo, adapted by Mary Cronk Farrell

This book focuses on Irena Sendler, a courageous young woman who, with a network of trusted colleagues, saved about 2500 children from the Warsaw Ghetto during World War II. With tremendous bravery and personal sacrifice, Irena and her network toiled throughout the war to find safe hiding places for Jewish children from the ghetto who otherwise would have been murdered. The account of Irena’s courage in the midst of terrible inhumanity is an inspiration. -Recommended by Marilyn Carpenter
Continue reading

WOW Recommends: Book of the Month

WOW Recommends: The Pact

The Pact by Amanda West Lewis
Book of the Month, September 2016
The Pact by Amanda West Lewis

Based on actual events, this WWII novel gives readers an inside look at how a German boy became and internally struggled with his role as a member of the Hitler Youth. This is a fascinating read that compels readers to think both about history and current political situations. -Recommended by Holly Johnson
Continue reading

Native American Children’s Books Featuring Animals

By Angeline P. Hoffman, White Mountain Apache

One of the themes from my studies, animals, derives from Native American children’s books featuring animals and the encountered stories about ethical or moral behaviors contained within them. Many Indigenous American cultures honor and revere animals. The people know that animals came into existence before man and animals have long been prevalent on Mother Earth. When men came, Animals communicated with humans and they still do. Therefore, they are respected; animals are considered Spirit helpers. Each animal has qualities that are special and powerful and shared with human beings if the animal is respected.

Antelope Woman cover, Native American children's books featuring animals
Continue reading

Native American Children’s Books and Foundations of Self-Knowledge

By Angeline P. Hoffman, White Mountain Apache

One way children can make a connection between history and their own lives is through storytelling that emphasizes self-image and the foundations of self-knowledge of one’s own people. The stories of indigenous people, past and present, are important because one must understand the larger context of life to gain perspective on personal experiences.

Foundations of Self-Knowledge, children's literature Continue reading

Native American Children’s Books on Indian Residential Schools

By Angeline P. Hoffman, White Mountain Apache

Children today, all children, need to be given the opportunity to understand history, even the parts that illustrate one people’s inhumanity to another people. For this understanding to occur, children need to be able to make a connection between the history being taught and their own lives. Dehumanizing Indian peoples in text and picture, justifying the atrocities committed in the name of “civilization,” presenting Carlisle founder Richard Henry Pratt’s disingenuous propaganda as fact, further adds to the vast body of disinformation being taught about Indian people.

Native American Children's Books on Indian Residential Schools Continue reading

WOW Recommends: Book of the Month

WOW Recommends: Worm Loves Worm

Worm Loves Worm by J.J. Austrian
Book of the Month, August 2016
Worm Loves Worm by J.J. Austrian with illustrations by Mike Curato

Worm Loves Worm is a delightful romp of a picture book that explores traditional gender roles in the marriage ceremony. The story demonstrates the silliness of requiring traditional cultural observances for any wedding. The humor in the text doesn’t make fun, but it demonstrates how a wedding can be a celebration that matches the needs and desires of the couple uniting in love. -Recommended by Marilyn Carpenter
Continue reading

Refugee and Migrant Narrative in Baddawi by Leila Abdelrazaq

By Seemi Aziz, University of Arizona

BaddawiBaddawi by Leila Abdelrazaq follows Ahmad, a struggling young boy raised in a refugee camp called “Baddawi” in North Lebanon. He tries to find himself and his identity while growing up in a place he cannot call home. His story represents one of the many thousands of refugee children born in Palestine who fled or were forced to leave their homeland after the war in 1948 and the establishment of the state of Israel.
Continue reading