Sharing Our Homeland: Palestinian and Jewish Children at Summer Peace Camp

Photo-essay focusing on two Israeli children, one Jewish and one Palestinian, who, in spite of their differences and the longstanding conflicts in the region, learn to play, work, and share ideas together at Summer Peace Camp, a day camp located in Israel.

Pea Boy and Other Stories from Iran

Retells folktales and fables from Iran, including the story of a mouse and a cockroach who fell in love, a foolish weaver’s apprentice, and a boy with the head of a chickpea.

 

Pride of Baghdad

A graphic novel looks at life on the streets of Baghdad during the Iraq War, inspired by true events. In the spring of 2003, a pride of lions escaped from the Baghdad Zoo during an American bombing raid. Lost and confused, hungry but finally free, the four lions roamed the decimated streets in a desperate struggle for their lives. Pride of Baghdad raises questions about the true meaning of liberation – can it be given, or is it earned only through self-determination and sacrifice? And in the end, is it truly better to die free than to live life in captivity?

Magid Fasts for Ramadan

It is the first day of Ramadan, the month when Muslims don’t eat and drink anything all day from sunrise to sunset. Magid’s parents have told him that he is not old enough to fast during the Ramadan, but Magid does not want to wait. Set in present-day Cairo, Egypt.

Mecca (Holy Cities)

Charts the development of Mecca as the most holy city for the world’s community of Muslims, and explains clearly the history of Islam itself; shows how Mecca symbolizes the richness of Islam through its traditions, its religious festivals, and powerful art and architecture.

Meat Eating Vegetarian

Tasneem is so happy at her new school and with her new friends, Lisa and Yvonne. Suddenly her friends start avoiding her and calling her names. What could possibly have happened and what has it to do with vegetarian dinners and wearing a scarf?

Nearly Nonsense

Nasrudin Hoja was a mullah (teacher) in Turkey. He was a busy man – he worked in a vineyard, gave sermons at the mosque, and was sometimes even a judge. He did all of this with a nagging wife, a constant stream of uninvited visitors, and many animals. Although Hoja’s life wasn’t easy, his heart was always light and his observations about life held a witty twist. For instance, when his donkey got lost, his neighbors offered sympathy, but Hoja found the bright side: “Imagine if I were riding the donkey at the time. I’d be lost too!”Though the ten Hoja stories presented by Rina Singh and richly illustrated by Farida Zaman are funny, each one contains such insight into human nature that Sufi teachers use them to illustrate their teachings. Traditional Turkish Hoja stories are much-loved throughout Asia, and Nearly Nonsense brings them to a North American readership sure to enjoy them and, through laughter, to learn from them.

Al Dudatu Al Shadidatu Al Gou

Arabic translation of The Very Hungry Caterpillar. One sunny Sunday, the caterpillar was hatched out of a tiny egg. He was very hungry. On Monday, he ate through one apple; on Tuesday, he ate through two pears; on Wednesday he ate through three plums – and still he was hungry. Strikingly bold, colorful pictures and a simple text in large clear type tell the story of the hungry little caterpillar’s progress through an amazing variety and quantity of foods. Full at last, he made a cocoon around himself and went to sleep, to wake up a few weeks later wonderfully transformed into a butterfly.