Grandpa’s Soup

When Grandma dies, Grandpa is too sad to do anything. All day long, day after day, he sits by himself in his house. Then, one day, Grandpa wakes up and realizes he misses the soup his wife used to make for him. So he decides to try to make the soup himself. Though each batch he makes is bigger and better than the last, Granpda hardly gets a taste of it. Unexpected visitors, hungry for soup, keep arriving at his door. Soon, Grandpa discovers that sharing with his new friends is the best cure for his loneliness.

Paula Knows What To Do

One Saturday morning, Daddy won’t get out of bed. He misses Paula’s mom. Paula misses her too, but she realizes that Mommy wouldn’t want them to be sad forever. Paula knows just what to do. Taking out paper and paints, Paula creates a world of rolling seas, blue skies, and―best of all―a boat that she and Dad can sail together. And when the wind blows up a storm, Paula knows just what she and Daddy can do about that too. In this sweet and poignant story about memory and overcoming grief, Sanne Dufft, the author/illustrator of The Night Lion shows how a child’s imagination can find a moment of joy and a safe place to land after a loved one is gone.

The Land Of Neverendings

Emily’s world is shattered after her sister dies and she finds she misses her sister’s teddy bear, Bluey, almost as much as her sister. Then Emily dreams of talking toys who have a message from Bluey, but soon discovers that magic from the toy world is spilling out into the real world with disastrous consequences. Emily must decide whether finding Bluey is worth risking the lives of those she loves.

Dad’s Camera

One day Dad comes home with one of those old cameras, the kind that uses film. But he doesn’t take photos of the regular things people photograph. He takes pictures of his keys, his coffee cup, the objects scattered on his desk. He starts doing a lot of things that are hard to understand, like putting items that belong in the fridge in the cupboard and ones that belong in the cupboard in the fridge. In a sensitive, touching tale about losing a family member to a terminal illness, Ross Watkins and Liz Anelli prove that love is the one thing that can never be forgotten.