Rapunzel

This retelling of a favorite fairy tale, illustrated by award-winning artist Trina Schart Hyman in an edition Publishers Weekly called “spellbinding,” has been lovingly restored. Digital technology brings back the clarity and brightness of Hyman’s original watercolor paintings to illuminate the terrifying woods, handsome prince, and Rapunzel’s lustrous hair, as Hyman originally painted them.

The Nightingale

When he learns that the nightingale’s song is one of the most beautiful sounds in the world, the Emperor of China sends his courtiers to find the bird and present it as a guest at court. The nightingale can speak to humans and agrees to come, but when the Emperor receives a mechanical nightingale covered in jewels, he discards the real bird, which flies back to its home. Hans Christian Andersen’s beloved story in which a king learns humility from a bird was written in 1843 to honor Jenny Lind, the famous opera singer dubbed the Swedish Nightingale. This new edition of the childhood favorite features shimmering color illustrations by Russian artist Igor Oleynikov.

Vasilisa The Wise

Once upon a time, these stories of magical transformation were told to young women by their mothers and grandmothers and the wise women of the clan. The heroines of these old tales set out on a difficult road of trials to discover their true destiny. And marrying a prince was not the only goal. These ancient tales of wonder and adventure are about learning to be strong, brave, kind and true-hearted, and trusting in yourself to change the world for the better.

Fearsome Giant, Fearless Child

The story of a child confronting a man-eating giant or witch is told the world over. These heroes go by many names and might be normal in size or no bigger than a thumb. Though they’re often scorned for being the youngest and smallest, they’re well-armed with cleverness and courage. In this companion to Glass Slipper, Gold Sandal, Newbery Medal winner Paul Fleischman and illustrator Julie Paschkis combine elements of this story from different traditions Jack and the Beanstalk, Tom Thumb, Kihuo, Vasilisa to create one narrative, one complete picture of a small boy’s triumph.

Stories Of The Night

First, Little Bear hears the story of the Night Guardian, who lives in the woods and makes sure all animals go to bed. But who tells the Night Guardian when it’s bedtime? The second story is about the brave girl Zhara who seeks the forest’s most delicious blackberries. In the third we meet Bo, the little man with the big overcoat, who finds it hard to sleep. Finally, Little Bear falls asleep, and there in bed beside her are her new storybook friends.