Joan Procter, Dragon Doctor: The Woman Who Loved Reptiles

Back in the days of long skirts and afternoon teas, young Joan Procter entertained the most unusual party guests: slithery and scaly ones, who turned over teacups and crawled past the crumpets…. While other girls played with dolls, Joan preferred the company of reptiles. She carried her favorite lizard with her everywhere–she even brought a crocodile to school!

Mary Anning and the Sea Dragon

An account of the finding of the first entire skeleton of an ichthyosaur, an extinct sea reptile, by a twelve-year-old English girl who went on to become a paleontologist.

What the Snakes Wrote

Rufus the farmyard dog first notices the strangely shaped snakes on the ground outside his house. The word they form with their bodies, DOG, looks oddly familiar. As Rufus goes about his patrol, the snakes follow behind. Soon dozens of snakes join in, until the farmer’s field is covered in words. What are the snakes trying to tell Rufus?

The farmer, busy covering up an old well in a far corner of his field, doesn’t realize that his action will destroy the wintertime home of the harmless snakes. But Rufus’s determination helps the snakes find a way to tell the farmer their predicament and save their home.

Tina Holdcroft’s illustrations are an energetic and fun-filled complement to a charming story that subtly presents the benefits of literacy as well as the importance of preserving animal habitats. A brief afterword gives young readers additional information about snakes.

Give Up, Gecko!

“Elephant! Elephant! Heavy! Heavy! Heavy! Elephant! Elephant! STOMP! STOMP! STOMP!” Elephant was shouting and stomping. But could he stomp a hole deep enough to reach water for the thirsty animals? Maybe…maybe not. All the animals tried until tiny Gecko Gecko takes a turn. He is small…but he is determined. And he’s not going to give up! Kids will love to chant and stomp along to this Ugandan folktale.

Snakes!: Strange and Wonderful

Provides a comprehensive look at the world of snakes through a presentation of the many types found around the world–reviewing their similarities, differences, and unique abilities.

Count on Culebra: Go from 1 to 10 in Spanish

A companion to the popular Manana, Iguana that teaches how to count in spanish. When Iguana stubs her toe, Doctor Culebra comes to the rescue. But his suggestions sound a little loco to everyone else. How will tying un rolling pin and dos kettles to Iguana’s tail make her better? And more importantly, will Iguana feel well enough to make her cactus butter dulces? The extremely popular “Manana, Iguana” has sold and reprinted quickly, and Ann Whitford Paul and Ethan Long’s previous titles have received much praise.

Kali And The Rat Snake

Kali’s father is a snake catcher – the best in the village. Kali knows that is really something to be proud of, but at school he sometimes gets embarrassed. The other children seem to think there is something very strange about having a snake catcher for a father and eating things like fried termites for a snack. Plus, Kali is the teacher’s pet. How will he ever make friends?