La Mala Suerte Is Following Me

In this fun picture book adventure exploring superstitions, Miguel finds himself grappling with La Mala Suerte (Mrs. Bad Luck)—and he’s determined to shake her off before it’s too late!

Ever since his abuelita warned him about the consequences of opening an umbrella indoors, Miguel’s life takes a turn for the worse. From stumbling over his own feet to flunking an exam and fumbling on the soccer field, Mrs. Bad Luck seems to shadow his every move. Desperate for a change of fortune, Miguel tries everything from hunting for four-leaf clovers to dabbling in his aunt’s “existential” oils, but to no avail.

With a blend of Spanish phrases and playful language, “La Mala Suerte Is Following Me” offers a delightful and heartfelt exploration of superstitions. Join Miguel on his zany quest to outwit Mrs. Bad Luck and reclaim control over his luck-filled adventures!

Let’s Play In The Park / Juguemos En El Parque (My Friend, Mi Amigo)

In the third installment of the My Friend, Mi amigo series, Joe and José embark on a playful adventure in the park. As they engage in various games and activities, their friendship blossoms while bridging language barriers. Follow along as these two companions, one English-speaking and the other Spanish-speaking, navigate the joys of climbing, sliding, and forging new connections. Ideal for preschoolers and early grade learners, this bilingual tale offers an immersive reading experience for families delving into English and Spanish.

Both Laínez, hailing from El Salvador, and Perez, originally from Puerto Rico, infuse their cultural backgrounds into the story, enriching the narrative with authenticity and warmth. For more bilingual adventures, explore titles like Let’s Be Friends, Seamos Amigos, and We Play Soccer / Jugamos al fútbol by the same talented duo.

It Feels Like Family / Se Siente Como Familia

Readers join Elena and Miguel as they navigate the changes brought about by their parents’ divorce. Living in two separate homes—Mami’s during the week and Papi’s on weekends—Elena and Miguel initially struggle with feelings of loss and fragmentation. Despite these initial challenges, Elena and Miguel gradually find moments of comfort and connection in their new routines. While the pancakes Papi makes may not taste exactly like Mami’s, they still bring a sense of warmth and familiarity. And at birthday parties surrounded by relatives and cousins, they rediscover the joy of family bonds.

Through its bilingual narrative, “Elena and Miguel’s Two Homes / Las Dos Casas de Elena y Miguel” sensitively explores the challenges of divorce and the importance of maintaining connections with extended family. It offers young readers a message of resilience, adaptation, and the enduring power of familial love to transcend changes in living arrangements.

¡los Animales No Se Dormían! =

As a budding scientist, Marco tries different ways of sorting his collection of stuffed animal toys before bedtime, but the animals have their own ideas.

I’m Hungry! / ¡tengo Hambre!

Nothing seems to do the trick! What does dinosaur want to eat? This delightful bilingual picture book is about finding just the right food―and just the right friend.

Viento, Vientito/ Wind, Little Wind

My name is Wind / but everyone knows me / as Little Wind.” In this beautiful, poetic ode to the refreshing but sometimes dangerous force of wind, award-winning children’s book author Jorge Argueta describes–in English, Spanish and Nahuat–the power of air from the perspective of a mischievous youngster.

El Niño De Maíz/ The Boy Of Maize

In a land where the yellow jaguar lives and the sun rises behind green mountains, “the earth was filled with joy” when Balam, the boy of maize, was born. He climbed on top of a big, blue turtle, and along with an assortment of other animals, began the journey to the village. Excited to spread the word about the child’s birth, the creatures worked together–each utilizing its special skills–in perfect harmony with Mother Earth. The turtle walked so slowly that he sent the louse ahead to give the good news to the townspeople. But the louse fell asleep in the road, so the toad swallowed him and said, “I will take you with the message.” The toad, exhausted from taking big leaps, was swallowed by the snake, and the snake, unable to cross the river, was swallowed by the hawk. When the bird flew into the village, the louse delivered the message, but long days and nights passed and still the boy did not arrive! Would the great turtle be able to deliver the special boy?

Josefina’s Habichuelas / Las Habichuelas De Josefina (Multilingual Edition)

Like all kids, Josefina loves to eat sweets. She loves warm chocolate chip cookies right out of the oven, cupcakes and candy! One night, while eating a piece of flan, Mami asks her to consider giving up sweets for Lent, the 40 days leading up to Easter. “That’s impossible!” Josefina says. When Mami promises to teach her how to make her favorite dessert, habichuelas con dulce, she agrees to give it a try. Josefina can’t wait to end her fast and eat the delicious sweet cream beans, her family’s traditional Easter dessert. While she and her mom, tias and abuela prepare the dish, they dance to merengue music and tell stories about life back in the Dominican Republic. The kitchen fills with the aromatic smells of cinnamon and sugar, but it’s the feelings of love and happiness Josefina will never forget. On Easter, when the family eats her special dessert, the girl’s grandmother says it’s the best she has ever tasted