Legend Of The First Unicorn

Once upon a time, a young prince lost his smile.
It seemed nothing would make Prince Donald smile, not songs from the musician or cakes from the baker. The court magician tried to make a new magical beast for the prince, but it was so frightening he let it go. Still determined to help Donald, the magician’s granddaughter, Hana, invents a majestic creature with the body of a horse and the horn of a gazelle, and calls him ‘a unicorn’.
Hana and Donald playfully chase the unicorn through the forest, and it seems that this magical animal might hold the key to the prince’s smile. But then they discover a darker beast, lurking in the trees.
This is a sparkling origin tale from the creators of The Treasure of the Loch Ness Monster

Brenda Is A Sheep

Brenda is exactly like all the other sheep. Well, except for the sharp teeth, gray fur, sharp claws, and orange sweater. All the sheep think that Brenda is just the best! Despite Brenda’s best efforts to enjoy the ultimate sheep feast, Brenda realizes that she is, after all, a sheep. A funny reminder that what you look like doesn’t dictate who you are.

The Boy With The Butterfly Mind

Jamie Lee just wants to be normal but his ADHD isn’t making it easy. If only he could control his butterfly mind he’d have friends, be able to keep out of trouble and he could live with his mom, not be sent to stay with his dad. Elin Watts just wants to be perfect. If she could be the best student and daughter possible, then maybe her dad would leave his new family and come back to live with Elin and her mom, happily ever after. When Jamie and Elin’s families blend, the polar opposites of chaotic Jamie and ordered Elin collide. As their lives spiral out of control, Jamie and Elin discover that they’re actually more alike than they’d admit. Maybe there’s no such thing as normal, or perfect. And perhaps, just like families, happy-ever-afters come in all shapes and sizes. Uplifting and moving, The Boy with the Butterfly Mind is an inspiring story of acceptance, blended families, and discovering that in the end, being yourself is more than enough.

Iced Out

Wilfred Walrus and Neville Narwhal are the only kids in Miss Blubber’s class who are not seals. Life is tough being the odd ones out – lunchtimes and football matches and school photos all present challenges to the two outliers. And they don’t even like each other very much!

The Weight of a Thousand Feathers

Seventeen-year-old Bobby Seed, the devoted but exhausted primary caregiver for his terminally-ill mother and difficult younger brother, finds respite in a support group and good friends, but must face his mother’s impossible choice alone.

The Night Box

When a little boy opens the Night Box, darkness swoops out, a fox uncurls, and a thousand stars sparkle and shine. Night flows freely then, cavorting and exploring, caring for all its creatures until morning comes, and it’s time for Night to rest again. With its soothing cadences and air of quiet wonder, The Night Box is sure to charm any sleepy listener who wonders what happens between sunset and sunrise.

The Fox Girl And The White Gazelle

Reema runs to remember the life she left behind in Syria. Caylin runs to find what she’s lost. Under the gray Glasgow skies, twelve-year-old refugee Reema is struggling to find her place in a new country, with a new language and without her brother. But she isn’t the only one feeling lost. Her Glasgwegian neighbor Caylin is lonely and lashing out. When they discover an injured fox and her cubs hiding on their estate, the girls form a wary friendship. And they are more alike than they could have imagined: they both love to run. As Reema and Caylin learn to believe again, in themselves and in others, they find friendship, freedom and the discovery that home isn’t a place, it’s the people you love.

Night Shift

In Night Shift, Debi Gliori has used her own personal experience with depression to create moving pieces of art that really capture how depression can feel, the way it isolates you from the world and makes even simple everyday tasks seem impossible. But, more importantly, she also shows that the feelings don’t last forever and that you can come out on the other side.

Featured in WOW Review Volume XI, Issue 2.