The Moose Of Ewenki

When a Mongolian elder named Gree Shrek hunts a female moose by mistake, her young calf is left behind. Saddened by her loss, Gree Shrek names the calf Xiao Han (“Little Moose”) and the moose and man form an authentic attachment. Xiao Han accompanies Gree Shrek as the hunter-gatherer herds reindeer, sets up camp, forages for food in the forest, and visits his peoples’ village, where many fun adventures happen. But as the little moose grows bigger, Gree Shrek knows he must return his companion to the forest. Richly detailed, painterly illustrations by Chinese fine artist Jiu’er bring authenticity and beauty to this thoughtful book, which illuminates the traditional and vanishing way of life for the Ewenki peoples of Inner Mongolia.

Hope Springs

A drought has settled in the area around the orphanage where Boniface lives. There are long line-ups at the tiny spring where all the local people get their water, and suddenly the orphans are pushed to the back of the line, unwelcome. Boniface’s houseparent, Henry, tells him that the people were mean out of fear–they feared there would not be enough water for their families. When the building of the orphanage’s well is completed, Boniface has an idea to help the villagers.

This book has been included in WOW’s Kids Taking Action Booklist. For our current list, visit our Boolist page under Resources in the green navigation bar.

When Children Play: The Story Of How Athletes, Coaches And Volunteers Are Protecting Children’s Right To Play

An orphaned girl in a Ugandan refugee camp. A former child soldier in the Sudan. When survival is the priority, something as simple and normal as play seems to be a luxury that these children can do without. But Right to Play is changing that perception. Founding in 2000 by Norwegian Olympic medalist Johann Olav Koss, Right to Play begins at the grassroots community level, using sports and games to teach at-risk and underprivileged children around the world important values like self-esteem, empathy, and peace.

Night Sounds

When the moon comes up over the mountains, all the animals in the rain forest go to sleep. But, what’s that noise? And how can the animals make it stop? “Wuaaah, wuaaah, wuaaah.” The noise goes on and on. Cuddled up inside an abandoned box, someone is sobbing, and one by one, the animals try to comfort the little one. But with each offering — of a blanket, some fresh water, mango, and so on — the small creature settles only briefly before wailing once again. Finally, Tiger disappears and returns with the little creature’s mother. Peace is restored, until . . . ”Wuu, wuu, wuuuuuu,” cries a child in a nearby village. This time, it is the little creature who solves the problem by yelling out, “That child must have a kiss! Then we can all go back to sleep.”