Litter Sister Rabbit Gets Lost

Little Sister Rabbit wants to have an adventure all by herself. She loves stamping in puddles, building boats and skimming stones without her clever big brother telling her what to do. But she’s having so much fun that she loses her way! Will Little Sister Rabbit be able to find her way home . . . or will she need help from someone unexpected? >From the award-winning Swedish children’s author, Ulf Nilsson, and one of Europe’s best-loved illustrators, Eva Eriksson, comes this charmingly illustrated tale of independence and sibling love. These classic Little Sister Rabbit stories are much-loved bestsellers in Sweden and can now be enjoyed by new generations in English. They are beautiful, full colour, hardback, gift editions with a cloth spine.

The Bathing Costume: Or The Worst Vacation Of My Life

The book’s protagonist is Michel, an eight-year-old Parisian boy. His brother Martin, who’s twelve, detests him, and he detests Martin right back. This summer, Michel will go away alone, which really means without his mom, to stay with his grandparents while his parents move apartments. To add to the horror, Michel’s older boy cousins will be going, too. As Michel says, “To put it simply, they are big, strong, and pals with Martin. I am their scapegoat.” Recounted by Michel himself, his vacation doesn’t turn out to be such a complete zero after all. Between a competition to see who can shower the least, wild bike rides without gear, and a tooth that finally falls out, Michel discovers both independence and real moments of happiness.

The White Bicycle

The White Bicycle is the third stand-alone title in the Wild Orchid series about a young woman with Asperger’s Syndrome. This installment chronicles Taylor Jane’s travels to the south of France where she spends a summer babysitting for the Phoenix family. Including flashbacks into Taylor’s earliest memories, along with immediate scenes in Lourmarin, a picturesque village in the Luberon Valley, The White Bicycle results in a journey for independence both personal and universal, told in Taylor’s honest first-person prose.