Pippi Longstocking

Tommy and his sister Annika have a new neighbor, and her name is Pippi Longstocking. She has crazy red pigtails, no parents to tell her what to do, a horse that lives on the porch and a pet monkey named Mr. Nilsson. Whether Pippi’s scrubbing her floors, doing arithmetic or stirring things up at a fancy tea party, her flair for the outrageous always seems to lead to another adventure.

Rapunzel

This retelling of a favorite fairy tale, illustrated by award-winning artist Trina Schart Hyman in an edition Publishers Weekly called “spellbinding,” has been lovingly restored. Digital technology brings back the clarity and brightness of Hyman’s original watercolor paintings to illuminate the terrifying woods, handsome prince, and Rapunzel’s lustrous hair, as Hyman originally painted them.

The Tiger Who Came To Tea

While Sophie and her mother are sitting down to tea one afternoon, the doorbell rings. A big, furry, stripy tiger has come for tea … and sandwiches, and buns, and biscuits … and eats all the food in the house until there’s nothing left to cook for Daddy’s supper. Judith Kerr’s reassuring and funny story — with just a hint of anarchy — has been delighting children since its first publication thirty-five years ago. This modern classic has gone on to sell over three million copies worldwide, making it one of the most popular picture books for children ever written.

Willy’s Stories

Every week, Willy walks through an ordinary-looking set of doors and straight into an adventure. Where will those doors lead him today—to a mysterious desert island with footprints in the sand? Down a deep, dark rabbit hole full of curious objects? Or perhaps aboard a pirate ship to stand face-to-face with Captain Hook?

Oh, The Places You’ll Go!

Don’t be fooled by the title of this seriocomic ode to success; it’s not ‘Climb Every Mountain,’ kid version. All journeys face perils, whether from indecision, from loneliness, or worst of all, from too much waiting. Seuss’ familiar pajama-clad hero is up to the challenge, and his odyssey is captured vividly in busy two-page spreads evoking both the good times (grinning purple elephants, floating golden castles) and the bad (deep blue wells of confusion). Seuss’ message is simple but never sappy: life may be a ‘Great Balancing Act,’ but through it all ‘There’s fun to be done.

Join the discussion of Oh, The Places You’ll Go! as well as other books centered around relocation on our My Take/Your Take page.

The Princess and the Giant

Princess Sophie is exhausted, and it’s all because that grumpy old giant up on the beanstalk can’t sleep. His stomps and stamps keep everyone awake. But as the resourceful Princess Sophie reads her favorite book of fairy tales, she wonders if she might just have the answer. She bravely climbs the beanstalk carrying a tasty bowl of porridge, a cuddly teddy bear, and cozy blanket to help soothe the giant.

Nurse Lugton’s Curtain

An enchanted world, frozen in the pattern of a drawing-room curtain,waits patiently while Nurse Lugton sews. Then, as she falls asleep in the lamplight, the antelope nods to the zebra, and soon the elephant, the tiger, the ostrich, and all the other creatures awaken and begin to make their way toward a sparkling lake and a magical town.

Les Miserables

Travel back to nineteenth-century France with ex-convict Jean Valjean as he tries to put his criminal past behind him and his fate intertwines with the ruthless Inspector Javert, determined to put Valjean back behind bars; the poor factory worker Fantine, whose struggle to provide for her child leads to her death; her orphaned daughter, Cosette, whom Valjean saves from poverty and neglect; and Cosette’s besotted suitor, Marius. As a revolution sweeps through Paris, can Valjean elude Javert and secure a happy life for Cosette before all is lost? Follow their story in Marcia Williams’s entertaining and easily digestible retelling for young readers.