Frog Brings Rain

As fire creeps toward the village of the First People, First Man and First Woman must find a way to quench the flames. First Woman asks the Bird People, the River People, and the Water People for assistance, but everyone she speaks to has an excuse. “Not me,” said Mockingbird. “The smoke would hurt my voice and I would never sing again.” “Not me,” said Snail. “I carry my house with me and I am slow.” “No,” said Beaver. “We’d like to help, but our river home would become a desert if we changed the flow of water.” At last, First Woman asks the mysterious Frog for help. Will he be able to stop the flames before they reach the village? Author Patricia Hruby Powell’s retelling of this Navajo folktale is as graceful as it is compelling, and as magical as the mythical time it describes.

Touched By Fire

Touched by Fire, Irene N. Watt’s exquisite new novel, explores one family’s journey as they flee from the pogroms of Russia in 1905, where the Cossacks burn villages to the ground, to Berlin, Germany, where Jews have a hard time living and working in peace, to the streets of the Lower East Side in New York. Teenage Miriam gives a first-hand account of the excitement everyone feels about going to America, the “Golden Land,” the journey in steerage, the arrival at Ellis Island, and the discrimination the immigrants feel while seeking employment. When Miriam finally lands a job at the Triangle Shirt Waist Company as a cuff setter, she believes her future in the New World is finally secure. But on March 25, 1911, the fire that starts from overflowing bins of material scraps rages into what becomes known as the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, and Miriam’s life is forever changed.

 

See the review at WOW Review, Volume VII, Issue 4

The Firekeeper’s Son

In Korea in the early 1800s, news from the countryside reached the king by means of signal fires. On one mountaintop after another, a fire was lit when all was well. If the king did not see a fire, that meant trouble, and he would send out his army. When his father is unable to light the fire one night, young Sang-hee must take his place. Sang-hee knows how important it is for the fire to be lit, but he wishes that he could see soldiers just once.

Beaver Steals Fire: A Salish Coyote Story

A long time ago, fire belonged only to the animals in the land above, not to those on the earth below. Curlew, keeper of the sky world, guarded fire and kept it from the earth. Coyote, however, devised a clever plan to steal fire, aided by Grizzly Bear, Wren, Snake, Frog, Eagle, and Beaver. These brave and resourceful animal beings raided the land above and risked all to steal fire from Curlew. Beaver Steals Fire is an ancient and powerful tale springing from the hearts and experiences of the Salish people of Montana. Steeped in the rich and culturally vital storytelling tradition of the tribe, this tale teaches both respect for fire and awareness of its significance, themes particularly relevant today. This unforgettable version of the story is told by Salish elder Johnny Arlee and beautifully illustrated by tribal artist Sam Sandoval. (20051219)

50 Burning Questions

A red-hot feast of fiery facts — the first book in Annick’s new 50 Questions seriesIf we took the time to examine flames in our world — fires that have built civilizations, sparked entire religions and literally changed the surface of the Earth — can you imagine how many questions we would have? The 50 questions in this book may be just the beginning, but they will intrigue and excite young readers.From “Who’s for dinner?” (before mastering fire, humans were more likely to be prey than predators) to “Who were the first firefighters?” (Romans over 2,000 years ago), the amazing questions and answers in this book reveal fire’s crucial role in our world.With a humorous touch (“Who was the first hairy potter?”), Tanya Lloyd Kyi presents fascinating facts alongside innovative activities for kids, like sending breath through a glass jar and playing spy games with a flashlight. Sidebars turn up the heat on the subject, while comical illustrations make for a fun and fiery visual presentation.

The Fire Stealer

This is the story of Nanabozho and how he brought fire to the Indians. Nanabozho transformed himself into a rabbit, tricked his way into a warrior’s wigwam and stole a torch of fire enabling his people to warm themselves in winter and cook their food. So that he would always be remembered for what he had done, Nananbozho worked his magic on the trees and every fall we still see the flaming colors of fire in their leaves.