Where We Go From Here

An absorbing debut novel about three gay friends in Brazil whose lives become intertwined in the face of HIV, perfect for fans of Adam Silvera and Bill Konigsberg.Ian has just been diagnosed with HIV. Victor, to his great relief, has tested negative. Henrique has been living with HIV for the past three years. When Victor finds himself getting tested for HIV for the first time, he can’t help but question his entire relationship with Henrique, the guy he has — had — been dating. See, Henrique didn’t disclose his positive HIV status to Victor until after they had sex, and even though Henrique insisted on using every possible precaution, Victor is livid. That’s when Victor meets Ian, a guy who’s also getting tested for HIV. But Ian’s test comes back positive, and his world is about to change forever. Though Victor is loath to think about Henrique, he offers to put the two of them in touch, hoping that perhaps Henrique can help Ian navigate his new life. In the process, the lives of Ian, Victor, and Henrique will become intertwined in a story of friendship, love, and self-acceptance. Set in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, this utterly engrossing debut by Brazilian author Lucas Rocha calls back to Alex Sanchez’s Rainbow Boys series, bringing attention to how far we’ve come with HIV, while shining a harsh light on just how far we have yet to go.

We Kiss Them With Rain

Life wasn’t always this hard for 14-year-old Mvelo. There were good times living with her mother and her mother’s boyfriend. Now her mother is dying of AIDS and what happened to Mvelo is the elephant in the room, despite its growing presence in their small shack. In this Shakespeare-style comedy, the things that seem to be are only a façade and the things that are revealed hand Mvelo a golden opportunity to change her fate. We Kiss Them With Rain explores both humor and tragedy in this modern-day fairy tale set in a squatter camp outside of Durban, South Africa.

Ana’s Story (Spanish Edition): La Historia De Ana: Un Camino Lleno De Esperanza

La historia de Ana comienza el día en que nació afectada con el VIH, virus que le transmitió su joven madre, quien muere pocos años después. Desde entonces, la infancia de Ana es una maraña de secretos—secretos sobre su enfermedad, su familia y los abusos que ha sufrido—. Arrastrada de una casa a otra, difícilmente encuentra seguridad o aceptación. Mas cuando se enamora y se embaraza a los diecisiete años, inicia una jornada que la conducirá a un nuevo comienzo, nuevas penas y una nueva esperanza.

Basada en su trabajo con UNICEF e inspirada en la vida de una chica que conoció personalmente, Jenna Bush narra la historia de muchos niños del mundo que viven marginados y excluidos de lo más elemental: cuidado, apoyo y educación. Al final del libro encontrarás una serie de recursos que te indican cómo puedes ayudar a cambiar la situación de niños como Ana y cómo puedes protegerte a ti y a los demás.

Ana’s Story: A Journey Of Hope

Ana’s story begins the day she is born with HIV, transmitted from her mother, who dies just a few years later. From then on, Ana’s childhood becomes a blur of secrets—about her illness, her family, and the abuse she endures. Shuffled from home to home, Ana rarely finds safety or acceptance. But after she falls in love and becomes pregnant at seventeen, she embarks on a journey that leads her to new beginnings, new sorrows, and new hope. Based on her work with UNICEF and inspired by the framework of one girl’s life, Jenna Bush tells the story of many children around the world who are excluded from basic care, support, and education. Resources at the back of this book share how you can help children like Ana and protect yourself and others.

The Girl Who Saw Lions (Neal Porter Books)

“BE STRONG MY ABELA.”  Orphaned by AIDS in Africa, Abela has a long journey ahead.When Abela’s mother dies of Aids in their African village, she is left to face the lions of the world. Lions like her Uncle Thomas who has plans to sell her in Europe. Lions like his bitter white wife, whom he abandons with Abela. Abela is forced to stay indoors in a sunless London apartment, cooking and cleaning, and hopelessly dreaming of her African homeland. Meanwhile, in a London suburb, Rosa is distraught when her mother tells her she wants to adopt a child. Rosa doesn’t want a sister or brother. Things were so good, why did they have to change? Berlie Doherty tells parallel stories, each separate and compelling in their own right, but stories that eventually tangle together bringing a message of hope and what it means to be a family.

Our Stories, Our Songs: African Children Talk about AIDS

In Malawi and Zambia, children who have lost family to the AIDS pandemic tell their stories. This book is about the power of the human spirit to endure and hope for a better tomorrow.