The Poesy Ring

When a young woman with tears in her eyes throws a gold ring into the wind in 1830, the ring settles in a meadow, and there it stays as the seasons pass — and then the years. But the ring’s journey is just beginning, and as more years go by, it moves at the mercy of the natural world: caught in the hoof of a young deer and flung across a meadow, tilled into the field of an unknowing farmer, dropped from the mouth of a magpie into the sea where countless tides wash over it. Will the ring, inscribed with the words love never dies, end its journey at the bottom of the ocean? Or does it have a greater destiny? Ever the master of weaving exquisite stories from the most unexpected threads, Bob Graham gives readers yet another collection of quiet moments that together form a transcendent, heartfelt tale.

The Yellow Balloon

Writer and illustrator Charlotte Dematons brings the same enchanting look to this picture book that made her Worry Bear and Looking for Cinderella so successful. Lovely watercolors portray a great and diverse planet teeming with life at all times of day and night. People and animals of every shape, color, size, and costume are seen, busy at work and play. As the yellow balloon floats through many time periods – ancient, medieval, and contemporary – and realms both natural and supernatural, young readers can also look for the small blue car, the fakir on his flying carpet, and the scoundrel in prison garb. This story will fascinate young readers as they embark on a lively and fun-filled journey around the globe.

Two White Rabbits

They travel mostly on the roof of a train known as The Beast, but the little girl doesn’t know where they are going. She counts the animals by the road, the clouds in the sky, the stars. Sometimes she sees soldiers. She sleeps, dreaming that she is always on the move, although sometimes they are forced to stop and her father has to earn more money before they can continue their journey.

See the review at WOW Review, Volume 8, Issue 3

Market!

Lewin takes readers on a whirlwind trip around the globe to marvel at the range of goods available for sale in the world’s markets. Woolen sweaters and ponchos in Ecuador; wood carvings, flutes, garlic and ginger in Nepal; Irish horses; Ugandan cows, bananas, and limes; fish in New York City; and dates, pottery, and donkeys in Morocco are just a few of the products depicted in the luminous watercolor paintings.

Little Dog Moon

“You must not use the mountain road.” “We know no other way,” the girl told him. “Perhaps not, but moon does,” answered Tenzin. He knelt down to stroke the long hair from the little dog’s eyes. “Take them. Show them the way.” A young monk is moved by the bravery of two children journeying alone to the freedom of Nepal. He offers what help he can–a hot bowl of soup, a warm bed for the night–but he realizes their best chance lies with Moon. She is the little dog who knows the unguarded paths out of the mountains, the very dog who will leave an ache in his heart when she goes. This story was inspired by the sacrifice and courage of those who struggle to be free. It is not uncommon in Tibet for parents to send their children into the treks through the mountains in the hope they will find refuge in Nepal. During the winter when the passes are not heavily guarded, the bitter cold is considered a smaller threat than remaining at home. Many such children have made it, many have turned back, many more have simply disappeared.

A Templar’s Gifts

The second book in Kat Black’s historical fantasy trilogy full of intrigue, mystery, and adventure! Something’s wrong with Tormod MacLeod. Ever since returning home his visions have become more intense and disorienting, making him increasingly ill and constantly on the verge of collapse. But then he meets Aine, a fiery, no-nonsense Scottish lass who has powers of her own and a special supernatural connection with Tormod–when they’re actually getting along. Together they must find the healer who can save Tormod’s life, all the while dodging King Philippe le Bel’s ruthless soldiers, who will stop at nothing to find Tormod and information about the secret he keeps.

The Bite of the Mango

The astounding story of one girl’s journey from war victim to UNICEF Special Representative.As a child in a small rural village in Sierra Leone, Mariatu Kamara lived peacefully surrounded by family and friends. Rumors of rebel attacks were no more than a distant worry.But when 12-year-old Mariatu set out for a neighboring village, she never arrived. Heavily armed rebel soldiers, many no older than children themselves, attacked and tortured Mariatu. During this brutal act of senseless violence they cut off both her hands.Stumbling through the countryside, Mariatu miraculously survived. The sweet taste of a mango, her first food after the attack, reaffirmed her desire to live, but the challenge of clutching the fruit in her bloodied arms reinforced the grim new reality that stood before her. With no parents or living adult to support her and living in a refugee camp, she turned to begging in the streets of Freetown.In this gripping and heartbreaking true story, Mariatu shares with readers the details of the brutal attack, its aftermath and her eventual arrival in Toronto. There she began to pull together the pieces of her broken life with courage, astonishing resilience and hope.

See the review at WOW Review, Volume 3, Issue 4