The Storyteller

Long, long ago, like a pearl around a grain of sand, the Kingdom of Morocco formed at the edge of the great, dry Sahara. It had fountains of cool, refreshing water to quench the thirst of the desert, and storytellers to bring the people together.

But as the kingdom grew, the people forgot the dangers of the desert, and they forgot about the storytellers, too. All but one young boy, who came to the Great Square for a drink and found something that quenched his thirst even better: wonderful stories. As he listened to the last storyteller recount the Endless Drought, and the Glorious Blue Water Bird, he discovered the power of a tale well told.

Water Rolls, Water Rises

A series of verses, in English and Spanish, about the movement and moods of water around the world and the ways in which water affects a variety of landscapes and cultures. Includes Author’s Note.

Every Last Drop

In the developed world, if you want a drink of water you just turn on a tap or open a bottle. But for millions of families worldwide, finding clean water is a daily challenge, and kids are often the ones responsible for carrying water to their homes. Every Last Drop looks at why the world’s water resources are at risk and how communities around the world are finding innovative ways to quench their thirst and water their crops. Maybe you’re not ready to drink fog, as they do in Chile, or use water made from treated sewage, but you can get a low-flush toilet, plant a tree, protect a wetland or just take shorter showers. Every last drop counts!

There’s A Hole In My Bucket

A retelling of a German folksong about a bear unable to water his flowers because every attempt to repair the hole in his bucket only leads to further problems.

Water Witcher

Water Witcher brings to life the experience of a family in drought-stricken rural Australia during the Depression era. Through the eyes of Dougie, the optimism of childhood shines through despite the tough work and harsh conditions. Jan Omerod’s stunning, evocative illustrations make this a rich and resonating book.

Water: Tales Of Elemental Spirits

What magical beings inhabit Earth’s waters? Some are as almost-familiar as the mer- people; some as strange as the thing glimpsed only as a golden eye in a pool at the edge of Damar’s Great Desert Kalarsham, where the mad god Geljdreth rules; or as majestic as the unknowable, immense Kraken, dark beyond the darkness of the deepest ocean, who will one day rise and rule the world. These six tales from the remarkable storytellers Robin McKinley and Peter Dickinson transform the simple element of water into something very powerful indeed.

The Day the Rains Fell

At the beginning of time a goddess descends to Earth and finds that parts of the land are dry, the plants are wilting, and the animals are thirsty, for even when it rains on the parched surface, the water just runs off. The goddess is inspired to make enormous pots of clay which she pushes into the earth to collect the rainwater so the animals can drink. While she works, her daughter collects bits of leftover clay and makes a necklace. Once the pots are in place, the animals show their gratitude by adding colors to the dull beads of the necklace—the flamingo gives its bright pink, the zebra its stripes, and the ant the deep red of the earth inside its anthill. Featuring beautiful watercolor illustrations and a page of information about traditional African pots and beads, this book also includes activities for children to do on their own.