Sigmund Freud: Giants Of Science #3 (Giants of Science (Viking))

Before Freud, nobody discussed “unconscious” motives, Oedipal complexes, the id and the ego, or Freudian slips. Freud was a complicated, often irascible man, who in 19th-century Vienna developed his still-controversial ideas and the new discipline of psyc.

The King And The Sea

“Buzz off,” said the king, shooing the bee from his flower. “Don’t you know I’m the king?” “And I’m the queen,” said the bee, stinging the king’s nose. These stunningly illustrated, ultra-short stories are seemingly simple but ultimately profound tales. In each story, the king has an encounter which he tries to rule over. But of course the rain doesn’t stop just because a king orders it, and tired eyelids can be much stronger than a king’s will. The king sees that his power has limits; the world is diverse and much of it operates under its own rules.

Bambi’s Children

Twin fawns Geno and Gurri are the children of Faline and Bambi. The pair must grow up and navigate the world of the woods with the help of their mother and Bambi, the new Prince of the Forest. But for young fawns, the wild can be dangerous. Gurri is injured by a fox and has a run-in with the most dangerous of creatures: man. Geno is challenged by rival deer and worries about the impending fight. But when the family begins to fall apart, it is the familiar presence of Bambi who tries to set it right again.

The Hound Of Florence

Walking through the streets of his hometown of Vienna, Lucas Grassi sees an archduke’s coach, with the archduke’s faithful dog running alongside. He wishes he could be the dog and be free from his everyday life. Then his wish comes true: Lucas does become the dog. Every other day he switches from his normal body to that of the archduke’s canine companion. Soon he learns the dog is treated badly and the archduke is not a nice man. Lucas decides he’ll do anything to reverse his wish if only he knew what to do!

Dragon Castle

Young Prince Rashko is frustrated with his familyÑno one does any thinking but him! The kingdom and castle seem to be in the hands of fools. So when Rashko’s parents mysteriously disappear and the evil Baron Temny parks his army outside the castle walls, it is up to the young prince to save the day. But there is more to this castle and its history than meets the eye, and Rashko will have to embrace his ancestry, harness a dragon, and use his sword-fighting skills to stop the baron and save the kingdom. Along the way, he realizes that his family is not quite as stupid as he always thought. Master storyteller Joseph Bruchac, known for his smart, gripping Native American books, here combines his signature action and adventure with a large dose of humor, which just brings this story to a whole new level.

A Daisy Is a Daisy Is a Daisy (Except When It’s a Girl’s Name)

Many girls are named after flowers (or even forms of the word “flower,” such as Flora). Girls’ names in different languages accompany her imaginative illustrations of flowers, so that the reader discovers, for example, that Gul means rose in Turkish, but that it is Rosa in Spanish and Rodanthe in Greek. Flowers named in the book include rose, heather, buttercup, sunflower, lily of the valley, daisy, bluebell, snowdrop, hyacinth, myrtle, camomile, cherry blossom, jasmine, violet, tulip, poppy. This can be used in the classroom to talk about culture, language and botany.