Peter In Peril

A moving graphic novel telling the true story of a young boy caught up in the terror of World War Two. Peter is just an ordinary boy, who loves playing football with his friends and eating cake – until war comes to his city and the whole family have to go into hiding… This moving, true story of the Second World War, set in Budapest, Hungary, shows in vivid words and pictures how Peter, his cousin Eva and his mum and dad bravely struggle to survive in a city torn apart by warfare.

Playing For The Commandant

“Look after each other and get home safe. And when you do, tell everyone what you saw and what they did to us.” These are Hanna’s father’s parting words to her and her sister when their family is separated at the gates of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp. Her father’s words–and a black C-sharp piano key hidden away in the folds of her dress–are all that she has left to remind her of life before. Before, Hanna was going to be a famous concert pianist. She was going to wear her yellow dress to a dance. And she was going to dance with a boy. But then the Nazis came. Now it is up to Hanna to do all she can to keep her mother and sister alive, even if that means playing piano for the commandant and his guests. Staying alive isn’t supposed to include falling in love with the commandant’s son. But Karl Jager is beautiful, and his aloofness belies a secret. And war makes you do dangerous things.

See the review at WOW Review, Volume VII, Issue 3

Climbing Rosa

Outside the King’s palace grows an enormous tree, its top hidden in the clouds. It’s so tall that no one has ever climbed to the top or collected any of its seeds. Rosa’s stepmother and stepsister Irma always call her a monkey because she can climb anything from drainpipes to trees. So when the King proclaims that whoever brings down seeds from the tree will marry his son, strong and sprightly Rosa decides to make her stepfamily regret their words. Shelley Fowles’s enchanting, faux-naïf illustrations highlight this gloriously funny adaptation of a traditional Hungarian folktale.

Puppet

A heartbreaking episode in history, explained through the story of a young servant girl in the late 1800s. The year is 1882. A young servant girl named Esther disappears from a small Hungarian village. Several Jewish men from the village of Tisza Eszvar face the ‘blood libel’ — the centuries-old calumny that Jews murder Christian children for their blood. A fourteen-year-old Jewish boy named Morris Scharf becomes the star witness of corrupt authorities who coerce him into testifying against his fellow Jews, including his own father, at the trial.

This powerful fictionalized account of one of the last blood libel trial in Europe is told through the eyes of Julie, a friend of the murdered Esther, and a servant at the jail where Morris is imprisoned. Julie is no stranger to suffering herself. An abused child, when her mother dies her alcoholic father separates her from her beloved baby sister. Julie and Morris, bound by the tragedy of the times, become unlikely allies. The novel is based upon a real court case that took place in Hungary in 1883. In Hungary today, the name Morris Scharf has become synonymous with “traitor.”

Le Pantin

Julie a une amie, Esther. Elles vivent dans un village de Hongrie,Tizla-Eszlar, elles sont pauvres, et la vie est dure. Le père de Julie la terrorise et la bat. Mais il y a aussi de la douceur, les paroles tendres et sages et aimantes de sa mère, du soleil, des spectacles forains. Et les yeux bruns de Moric Scharf, un jeune garçon juif timide que Julie aime bien. Un jour de printemps Esther disparaît. Et la rumeur gronde, une rumeur venue du fond des âges, qui veut que les juifs soient responsables de tous les maux, le pogrom menace, les cris montent. On jette en prison les hommes juifs. Les villageois se rassemblent, et un simulacre de procès se prépare. Tout a l’air décidé d’avance. Rien ne se passera comme prévu. Eva Wiseman s’est souvenue de ce fait divers réel que sa mère évoquait quand elle était petite, elle a rassemblé des tonnes de documentation, elle a écrit un roman inoubliable, qui serre le coeur et tient en haleine, parce qu’il démonte les mécanismes de la peur, de la lâcheté, de la violence collective. On ne peut plus oublier Julie Vamosi, toute petite devant les juges, devant la haine raciste, mais fidèle à son amie, et forte de son amour pour les êtres.

Little Rooster’s Diamond Button

Little Rooster is happy to find a diamond button-it’s a perfect present for his mistress. Then along comes the King, who snatches the button for his treasure chamber! And when Little Rooster demands the button back, the King is so furious he has Little Rooster thrown into a well. One thing the King doesn’t know: Little Rooster has a magic stomach. Water? Fire? Bees? No problem! Children will cheer for the spunky hero of Margaret Read MacDonald’s sparkling retold tale, which she has been sharing with children since 1965. Will Terry’s vibrant and funny paintings complete the delight. The author lives in Washington State; the illustrator lives in California.

The Little Golden Lamb

In this joyfully retold Hungarian version of “The Golden Goose,” a shepherd lad befriends a lamb whose fleece is the color of gold. The lad and the lamb set off on a journey, with the lamb dancing and frolicking as the boy plays his flute. Along the way they meet one person after another who tries to put an end to their merriment, but soon enough each has no choice but to join the cheerful procession and help the shepherd boy win his fortune and fulfill his destiny. Whimsically illustrated in delicious colors, this lively tale about the magic of music and the infectiousness of a light heart will have young children ready to join in the celebration.

Puppet

The year is 1882. A young servant girl named Esther disappears from a small Hungarian village. Several Jewish men from the village of Tisza Eszvar face the ‘blood libel’ — the centuries-old belief that Jews murder Christian children for their blood. A fourteen-year-old Jewish boy named Morris Scharf becomes the star witness of corrupt authorities who coerce him into testifying against his fellow Jews, including his own father, at the trial.

This fictionalized account of one of the last blood libel trial in Europe is told through the eyes of Julie, a friend of the murdered Esther, and a servant at the jail where Morris is imprisoned. Julie is no stranger to suffering herself: abused by her alcoholic father and separated from her beloved baby sister, she is as bound up in the tragedy of the times as is Morris. The book is based upon a real court case that took place in Hungary in 1883. In Hungary today, the name Morris Scharf has become synonymous with “traitor.”