Rachel’s Promise (The Rachel Trilogy)

It is late 1903, and Rachel and her family are leaving Russia to escape the murderous riots against Jews. They travel cross country on the Trans-Siberian Railway to the coast and board a ship for Shanghai. China offers refuge, but life for them there is difficult and strange. Rachel is determined to ensure her family’s survival, but does not want to give up her dreams for her future. The opportunity to write for a Jewish newspaper in Shanghai may be the solution she’s been hoping for. The story that began in the novel Rachel’s Secret continues in Rachel’s Promise and Rachel’s Hope.

Join the discussion of Rachel’s Promise as well as other books centered around relocation on our My Take/Your Take page.

Rescuing the Children: The Story of the Kindertransport

This important book tells the story of how ten thousand Jewish children were rescued out of Nazi Europe just before the outbreak of World War II. They were saved by the Kindertransport — a rescue mission that transported the children (or Kinder) from Nazi-ruled countries to safety in Britain.

The book includes real-life accounts of the children and is illustrated with archival photographs, paintings of pre-war Nazi Germany by artist, Hans Jackson, and original art by the Kinder commemorating their rescue.

Happy Harry’s Cafe

Harry makes great soup. So Harry’s friends are always running to his cafe´ just for that famous soup. One day, Ryan the Lion, Jo the Crow, and Matt the Cat all bustle into Harry’s shop. “Take it easy!” says Harry. But maybe Harry is taking it too easy? You see, Matt the Cat is not too happy with his soup today. Oy vey! He doesn’t want to kvetch, but won’t Harry please try it to find out what could possibly be wrong?

Beyond Courage: The Untold Story of Jewish Resistance During the Holocaust

In a stirring chronicle, Doreen Rappaport brings to light the courage of countless Jews who organized to sabotage the Nazis and help other Jews during the Holocaust.

Under the noses of the military, Georges Loinger smuggles thousands of children out of occupied France into Switzerland. In Belgium, three resisters ambush a train, allowing scores of Jews to flee from the cattle cars. In Poland, four brothers lead more than 1,200 ghetto refugees into the forest to build a guerilla force and self-sufficient village. And twelve-year-old Motele Shlayan entertains German officers with his violin moments before setting off a bomb. Through twenty-one meticulously researched accounts — some chronicled in book form for the first time — Doreen Rappaport illuminates the defiance of tens of thousands of Jews across eleven Nazi-occupied countries during World War II. In answer to the genocidal madness that was Hitler’s Holocaust, the only response they could abide was resistance, and their greatest weapons were courage, ingenuity, the will to survive, and the resolve to save others or to die trying.