Grandpa’s Top Threes

Henry loves talking with Grandpa, but Grandpa has stopped listening. Mom says to just give him time. But Henry wants to talk to Grandpa now. So Henry tries his favorite game: Top Threes. And something amazing happens: Grandpa starts talking again. Out of a tale of favorite sandwiches and zoo animals, outings and trains, emerges a moving story about love, loss, and the wonder of grannies and grandpas.

Saffron Ice Cream

Rashin is excited about her first visit to the beach in her family’s new home. On the way there, she remembers what beach trips were like in Iran, the beautiful Caspian Sea, the Persian music, and most of all, the saffron ice cream she shared with her best friend, Azadeh. But there are wonderful things in this new place as well a subway train, exciting music and maybe even a new friend!

Grandpa’s Girls

A young girl delights in a visit to her grandpa’s farm. She and her cousins run through the fields, explore the root cellar where the smoked salmon and jars of fruit are stored, swing on a rope out the barn loft window, visit the appaloosa in the corral and tease the neighbor’s pig. The visit is also an opportunity for this child to ask Grandpa what her grandmother, Yahyah, was like, and explore the “secret room,” with its old wooden box of ribbons, medals and photos of Grandpa in uniform.

The Turtle Of Oman

When Aref, a third-grader who lives in Muscat, Oman, refuses to pack his suitcase and prepare to move to Michigan, his mother asks for help from his grandfather, his Siddi, who takes Aref around the country, storing up memories he can carry with him to a new home.

Join the discussion of The Turtle of Oman as well as other books centered around relocation on our My Take/Your Take page.

El Terror De Sexto “B” Y Otras Historias Del Colegio

The seven stories that make up this work tell about situations that occur inside and outside the classroom, such as the moment of a first kiss, the most daring kid in the class, the girl who can t stand gym class, and the boy who is in love but doesn’t know how to show it. The book manages two things uncommonly found in a single book: to interest and to entertain. Its author has written real, fresh stories of school days which any student (or teacher) can identify with.