F Is For Fiesta

From adornos (decorations) going up all over the house, biscochitos (cupcakes) baking in the oven, and a special treat of churros (doughnut sticks) for breakfast, this can only be the beginning of a fabulous cumpleaños (birthday)! As the alphabet continues, the story highlights fun elements of a boy’s never-ending birthday celebration, including entries for ch, ll, ñ, and rr that make this a truly Latino ABC fiesta.

Clever verse and exuberant illustrations make the meaning of each Spanish word clear, and an author’s note explains the difference between the English and Spanish alphabets.

Charro (Spanish-Language)

Charro is the Mexican term for horseman, but for a Mexican a charro is much more than a cowboy. A skilled rider of horses and bulls and bucking broncos, an artist with a lariat, and a model of gentlemanly dress and behavior, the charro is also a living symbol of Mexico’s patriotic past. In the rodeo-like sport called la charrería, male charros and female charras, children and adults, show off their skill and daring. But more than that they are showing off their pride in their country–because to be a charro is to be a Mexican.

Pillars of Gold and Silver

After her father is killed in the Korean War, young Blanca Estela and her mother leave California to spend the summer in Revilla, an old town in Northern Mexico with Blanca’s grandmother. At first, Blanca is unhappy in their holiday retreat, but gradually makes friends and becomes part of the community.

The Tequila Worm

Sofia comes from a family of storytellers. Here are her tales of growing up in the barrio in McAllen, Texas, full of the magic and mystery of family traditions: making Easter cascarones, celebrating el Dia de los Muertos, preparing for quinceañera, rejoicing in the Christmas nacimiento, and curing homesickness by eating the tequila worm. When Sofia is singled out to receive a scholarship to boarding school, she longs to explore life beyond the barrio, even though it means leaving her family to navigate a strange world of rich, privileged kids. It’s a different mundo, but one where Sofia’s traditions take on new meaning and illuminate her path.

From The Bellybutton Of The Moon And Other Summer Poems/Del Ombligo De La Luna Y Otros Poemas De Verano

From the Bellybutton of the Moon is renowned poet Francisco X. Alarcon’s fresh collection of 22 bilingual poems inspired by his touching recollections of childhood summers in Mexico. With a poet’s magical vision, Alarcon takes us back to his childhood when he traveled with his family to Mexico to visit his grandma and other relatives. We travel with him in the family station wagon, across the misty mountain range to the little town of Atoyac. There, in the beloved town of his ancestors, we hear his grandma’s stories, sample Auntie Reginalda’s tasty breakfasts, learn about the keys to the universe, and take playful dips in the warm sea. The lighthearted illustrations of Maya Christina Gonzalez perfectly capture the spirit of a summer in Alarcon’s Mexico where “colors are more colorful, tastes are tastier, and even time seems to slow down.”

My Land Sings: Stories from the Rio Grande

A collection of ten original and traditional stories set in New Mexico, including “Lupe and la Llorona,” “The Shepherd Who Knew the Language of Animals,” and “Coyote and Raven.”

 

See the review at WOW Review, Volume 3, Issue 2

The Moon is La Luna: Silly Rhymes in English And Spanish

This book is full of monos, ratons, and osos. What’s that, you say? You don’t know what a mono is? What about a rio, some pelo, or even an árbol? No? Still no idea? You should read this libro, then. By the time you finish, you’ll be able to recognize and understand more than fifty simple Spanish words. You’ll be saying, “Mas, por favor!” You may even ask your papá to buy you a gato or pato. (But not your papa. Potatoes can’t buy pets.)

Sweet Dreams/Dulces Suenos (My Family: Mi Familia)

Shh, shh, close your eyes.
Shh . . . shh . . . Cierra los ojitos.
Outside, the rabbits are sleeping,
Afuera, los conejitos están durmiendo
and the birds, and the squirrels.
junto con los pajaritos, y las ardillas.
Inside, Grandma tucks
us snugly into bed.
Adentro, Abuelita nos da
las buenas noches.
The stars and moon
are shining bright.
Las estrellas y la
luna brillan.

Sweet dreams!
¡Dulces sueños!

As warm and comforting as a grandmother’s voice, this endearing book in the My Family/Mi familia series makes bedtime a soothing family tradition.

Este encantador libro de la serie My Family/Mi familia, tan cálido y reconfortante como la voz de una abuela, ayuda a convertir la hora de dormir en una armoniosa tradición familiar.

Making Magic Windows: Creating Papel Picado/Cut-Paper Art with Carmen Lomas Garza

 This book introduces the traditional Mexican craft of papel picado. It provides instructions for making paper banners and more intricate cut-outs and includes diagrams for creating specific images.

Sor Juana Ines De La Cruz: A Trailblazing Thinker

Recounts the inspiring story of the young seventeenth-century Mexican girl who, forbidden a formal education and opposed by the Spanish Inquisition, became one of Mexico’s greatest writers and thinkers.