Not A Bean

With Spanish vocabulary and a clever counting concept, this poetic story shares the life cycle of a Mexican jumping bean. This curious jumping insect is actually a seedpod from a shrub called yerba de la flecha, into which a caterpillar burrows, living inside the pod until it builds a cocoon and breaks out as a moth. Perfect for preschoolers and prereaders, this creative picture book explores the Mexican jumping bean’s daily life and eventual transformation and escape from the pod.

Blue Planet: Life in Our Oceans and Rivers

Every creature in the ocean—from the tiny snail to the enormous blue whale—depends on water for survival. This engaging book introduces children to the animals that live in the world’s oceans, rivers, lakes, and ponds. It also presents fascinating facts about the water cycle, different modes of transportation in water, and how water is prepared for drinking.

Todos Iguales

The story of the 1931 Lemon Grove incident, in which Mexican families in southern California won the first school desegregation case in United States history. Told in Spanish and English. Includes a corrido (ballad), and information about the people involved and events leading up to and after the court case ruling.

Saving The Tasmanian Devil

In this addition to the critically acclaimed Scientist in the Field series, Dorothy Patent follows the scientists trying to put a stop to a gruesome disease before it’s too late. Tasmanian devils are dying at an alarming rate from a type of tumor that appears to be contagious. What scientists are learning while researching the Tasmanian devil has potential to affect all animals, and even humans, as they learn more about how to prevent and hopefully eradicate certain genetic diseases.

The Moon

For centuries, humankind has gazed up at the Moon in awe and wonder. It has been a source of inspiration to artists, astronomers, poets, and mathematicians alike. But how much do we really know about our closest neighbor? Explore the history of mankind’s relationship with the Moon: the science, the myths, the facts, the fiction, and how it affects our everyday lives and the world around us.

I Am Sacajawea, I Am York

When Lewis and Clark’s Corps of Discovery set out in the spring of 1804, they had chosen to go on an unprecedented, extremely dangerous journey. It would be the adventure of a lifetime. Unlike others in the group, two key members did not choose to join the hazardous expedition: York, Clark’s slave, and Sacajawea, considered to be the property of Charbonneau, the expedition’s translator. The unique knowledge and skills Sacajawea and York had were essential to the success of the trip. The dual stories of these two outsiders, who earned their way into the inner core of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, shed new light on one of the most exciting and important undertakings in American history.